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Title: Negative Ion Drift Time Projection Chamber Development for High-Resolution Tracking

Abstract

Gas Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are used extensively in High Energy Physics. Modern micro-pattern gaseous detectors (MPGDs) have made it feasible to construct large-volume TPCs with high readout granularity, so that ionization can be imaged with spatial resolution of order 100 μm or better. A challenge with large TPCs is preserving the track geometry over large drift distances. The reduced diffusion offered by negative ion drift (NID) has long been considered a possible means to scaling up TPCs at reduced cost, but NID has up to now required toxic and often flammable multi-component gas mixtures. A number of recent breakthroughs in the field have, however, led to a resurgence of interest in NID gas TPCs: First, it was found that multiple charge carriers in NID can be utilized to measure the absolute position of primary ionization in the drift direction, yielding a powerful new handle on backgrounds, at zero additional cost. Second, work by one of the PIs has revealed SF6 gas to be a non-toxic, non-flammable, NID gas with suitable minority charge carriers present. Third, preliminary work by the PIs suggests that multiple MPGD technologies work well with SF6. This opens the door to a new generation of large,more » high-resolution, low-background, low-cost gas TPCs. In this work we will investigate MPGD charge multiplication and charge readout in NID TPCs with SF6 gas. The objectives are to quantify the improvement over electron drift TPCs, and to identify the optimal MPGD types, operational parameters, electronics, and vacuum technologies for future low-background experiments. We will measure low-level detector performance parameters such as gain, gain resolution, and spatial resolution, as well as the resulting higher-level performance parameters such nuclear recoil identification efficiency, gamma-ray background rejection, track angle resolution and recoil energy resolution. The proposed work also includes investigation of acrylic vacuum vessels and collaboration on dedicated charge readout chips, both required for next-generation NID MPGD TPCs. MGPD NID TPCs may prove transformative for applications which require both high readout granularity and large detector volumes, such as the reconstruction of nuclear recoils in the context of large-scale directional dark matter searches, measurements of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, and directional neutron detection. While the proposed work is focused on nuclear recoils, the lessons learned will be widely applicable to gas TPCs in HEP, and hence have broad impact.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Wellesley College
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1474819
Report Number(s):
DOE-WELLESLEY-18282
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0018282
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Battat, James. Negative Ion Drift Time Projection Chamber Development for High-Resolution Tracking. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1474819.
Battat, James. Negative Ion Drift Time Projection Chamber Development for High-Resolution Tracking. United States. doi:10.2172/1474819.
Battat, James. Wed . "Negative Ion Drift Time Projection Chamber Development for High-Resolution Tracking". United States. doi:10.2172/1474819. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1474819.
@article{osti_1474819,
title = {Negative Ion Drift Time Projection Chamber Development for High-Resolution Tracking},
author = {Battat, James},
abstractNote = {Gas Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are used extensively in High Energy Physics. Modern micro-pattern gaseous detectors (MPGDs) have made it feasible to construct large-volume TPCs with high readout granularity, so that ionization can be imaged with spatial resolution of order 100 μm or better. A challenge with large TPCs is preserving the track geometry over large drift distances. The reduced diffusion offered by negative ion drift (NID) has long been considered a possible means to scaling up TPCs at reduced cost, but NID has up to now required toxic and often flammable multi-component gas mixtures. A number of recent breakthroughs in the field have, however, led to a resurgence of interest in NID gas TPCs: First, it was found that multiple charge carriers in NID can be utilized to measure the absolute position of primary ionization in the drift direction, yielding a powerful new handle on backgrounds, at zero additional cost. Second, work by one of the PIs has revealed SF6 gas to be a non-toxic, non-flammable, NID gas with suitable minority charge carriers present. Third, preliminary work by the PIs suggests that multiple MPGD technologies work well with SF6. This opens the door to a new generation of large, high-resolution, low-background, low-cost gas TPCs. In this work we will investigate MPGD charge multiplication and charge readout in NID TPCs with SF6 gas. The objectives are to quantify the improvement over electron drift TPCs, and to identify the optimal MPGD types, operational parameters, electronics, and vacuum technologies for future low-background experiments. We will measure low-level detector performance parameters such as gain, gain resolution, and spatial resolution, as well as the resulting higher-level performance parameters such nuclear recoil identification efficiency, gamma-ray background rejection, track angle resolution and recoil energy resolution. The proposed work also includes investigation of acrylic vacuum vessels and collaboration on dedicated charge readout chips, both required for next-generation NID MPGD TPCs. MGPD NID TPCs may prove transformative for applications which require both high readout granularity and large detector volumes, such as the reconstruction of nuclear recoils in the context of large-scale directional dark matter searches, measurements of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, and directional neutron detection. While the proposed work is focused on nuclear recoils, the lessons learned will be widely applicable to gas TPCs in HEP, and hence have broad impact.},
doi = {10.2172/1474819},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}