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Title: Global carbon intensity of crude oil production

Abstract

Producing, transporting, and refining crude oil into fuels such as gasoline and diesel accounts for ~15 to 40% of the 'well-to-wheels' life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of transport fuels (1). Reducing emissions from petroleum production is of particular importance, as current transport fleets are almost entirely dependent on liquid petroleum products, and many uses of petroleum have limited prospects for near-term substitution (e.g., air travel). Better understanding of crude oil GHG emissions can help to quantify the benefits of alternative fuels and identify the most cost-effective opportunities for oil-sector emissions reductions (2). Yet, while regulations are beginning to address petroleum sector GHG emissions (3-5), and private investors are beginning to consider climate-related risk in oil investments (6), such efforts have generally struggled with methodological and data challenges. First, no single method exists for measuring the carbon intensity (CI) of oils. Second, there is a lack of comprehensive geographically rich datasets that would allow evaluation and monitoring of life-cycle emissions from oils. We have previously worked to address the first challenge by developing open-source oil-sector CI modeling tools [OPGEE (7, 8), supplementary materials (SM) 1.1]. Here, we address the second challenge by using these tools to model well-to-refinery CI of allmore » major active oil fields globally - and to identify major drivers of these emissions.« less

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC); Aramco Services Company; Ford Motor Company; Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; Hewlett Foundation; ClimateWorks Foundation; Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
OSTI Identifier:
1471482
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-6A20-70554
Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 361; Journal Issue: 6405; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; transport; crude oil

Citation Formats

Masnadi, Mohammad S., El-Houjeiri, Hassan M., Schunack, Dominik, Li, Yunpo, Englander, Jacob G., Badahdah, Alhassan, Monfort, Jean-Christophe, Anderson, James E., Wallington, Timothy J., Bergerson, Joule A., Gordon, Deborah, Koomey, Jonathan, Przesmitzki, Steven, Azevedo, Inês L., Bi, Xiaotao T., Duffy, James E., Heath, Garvin A., Keoleian, Gregory A., McGlade, Christophe, Meehan, D. Nathan, Yeh, Sonia, You, Fengqi, Wang, Michael, and Brandt, Adam R. Global carbon intensity of crude oil production. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aar6859.
Masnadi, Mohammad S., El-Houjeiri, Hassan M., Schunack, Dominik, Li, Yunpo, Englander, Jacob G., Badahdah, Alhassan, Monfort, Jean-Christophe, Anderson, James E., Wallington, Timothy J., Bergerson, Joule A., Gordon, Deborah, Koomey, Jonathan, Przesmitzki, Steven, Azevedo, Inês L., Bi, Xiaotao T., Duffy, James E., Heath, Garvin A., Keoleian, Gregory A., McGlade, Christophe, Meehan, D. Nathan, Yeh, Sonia, You, Fengqi, Wang, Michael, & Brandt, Adam R. Global carbon intensity of crude oil production. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aar6859.
Masnadi, Mohammad S., El-Houjeiri, Hassan M., Schunack, Dominik, Li, Yunpo, Englander, Jacob G., Badahdah, Alhassan, Monfort, Jean-Christophe, Anderson, James E., Wallington, Timothy J., Bergerson, Joule A., Gordon, Deborah, Koomey, Jonathan, Przesmitzki, Steven, Azevedo, Inês L., Bi, Xiaotao T., Duffy, James E., Heath, Garvin A., Keoleian, Gregory A., McGlade, Christophe, Meehan, D. Nathan, Yeh, Sonia, You, Fengqi, Wang, Michael, and Brandt, Adam R. Thu . "Global carbon intensity of crude oil production". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aar6859.
@article{osti_1471482,
title = {Global carbon intensity of crude oil production},
author = {Masnadi, Mohammad S. and El-Houjeiri, Hassan M. and Schunack, Dominik and Li, Yunpo and Englander, Jacob G. and Badahdah, Alhassan and Monfort, Jean-Christophe and Anderson, James E. and Wallington, Timothy J. and Bergerson, Joule A. and Gordon, Deborah and Koomey, Jonathan and Przesmitzki, Steven and Azevedo, Inês L. and Bi, Xiaotao T. and Duffy, James E. and Heath, Garvin A. and Keoleian, Gregory A. and McGlade, Christophe and Meehan, D. Nathan and Yeh, Sonia and You, Fengqi and Wang, Michael and Brandt, Adam R.},
abstractNote = {Producing, transporting, and refining crude oil into fuels such as gasoline and diesel accounts for ~15 to 40% of the 'well-to-wheels' life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of transport fuels (1). Reducing emissions from petroleum production is of particular importance, as current transport fleets are almost entirely dependent on liquid petroleum products, and many uses of petroleum have limited prospects for near-term substitution (e.g., air travel). Better understanding of crude oil GHG emissions can help to quantify the benefits of alternative fuels and identify the most cost-effective opportunities for oil-sector emissions reductions (2). Yet, while regulations are beginning to address petroleum sector GHG emissions (3-5), and private investors are beginning to consider climate-related risk in oil investments (6), such efforts have generally struggled with methodological and data challenges. First, no single method exists for measuring the carbon intensity (CI) of oils. Second, there is a lack of comprehensive geographically rich datasets that would allow evaluation and monitoring of life-cycle emissions from oils. We have previously worked to address the first challenge by developing open-source oil-sector CI modeling tools [OPGEE (7, 8), supplementary materials (SM) 1.1]. Here, we address the second challenge by using these tools to model well-to-refinery CI of all major active oil fields globally - and to identify major drivers of these emissions.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aar6859},
journal = {Science},
issn = {0036-8075},
number = 6405,
volume = 361,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}