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Title: Technologies for Characterizing Molecular and Cellular Systems Relevant to Bioenergy and Environment. Workshop report, September 21–23, 2016

Abstract

The Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) funds basic research on plants and microbes relevant to several DOE bioenergy and environmental mission areas. BSSD’s long history of developing and supporting genomic characterization of biological systems has led, in part, to the high-throughput DNA sequencing technology available to researchers worldwide. In recent years, genome sequencing has vastly outpaced the ability to interpret genome function. Fully maximizing this wealth of data will require new technology advancements, along with improvements and an increase in the throughput of existing methods for characterizing molecular- to cellular-level processes important for inferring biological function. BSSD research seeks to understand the fundamental genome-encoded properties of plants and microbes that can be harnessed or redesigned for beneficial purposes. Current emphases are leading to the discovery, development, and understanding of numerous plant and microbial species with traits suitable for the production of fuels and chemical products from renewable biomass that could be grown synergistically with food or animal feed crops while not competing with other societal needs. Additionally, BSSD further supports research leading to an understanding of the complex and essential interactions among plants, microbial communities, andmore » the environment to find new ways to sustainably produce biomass for a range of bioenergy and bioproduct applications. This research also is relevant for incorporation into larger-scale environmental models such as those developed through the research supported by BER’s Earth and Environmental Systems Sciences programs.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)
  3. USDOE Office of Science (SC), Washington, D.C. (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Washington, D.C. (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1471216
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-0189
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Adams, Paul, Wright, Elizabeth, Anderson, Todd, and Swain, Amy. Technologies for Characterizing Molecular and Cellular Systems Relevant to Bioenergy and Environment. Workshop report, September 21–23, 2016. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1471216.
Adams, Paul, Wright, Elizabeth, Anderson, Todd, & Swain, Amy. Technologies for Characterizing Molecular and Cellular Systems Relevant to Bioenergy and Environment. Workshop report, September 21–23, 2016. United States. doi:10.2172/1471216.
Adams, Paul, Wright, Elizabeth, Anderson, Todd, and Swain, Amy. Fri . "Technologies for Characterizing Molecular and Cellular Systems Relevant to Bioenergy and Environment. Workshop report, September 21–23, 2016". United States. doi:10.2172/1471216. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1471216.
@article{osti_1471216,
title = {Technologies for Characterizing Molecular and Cellular Systems Relevant to Bioenergy and Environment. Workshop report, September 21–23, 2016},
author = {Adams, Paul and Wright, Elizabeth and Anderson, Todd and Swain, Amy},
abstractNote = {The Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) funds basic research on plants and microbes relevant to several DOE bioenergy and environmental mission areas. BSSD’s long history of developing and supporting genomic characterization of biological systems has led, in part, to the high-throughput DNA sequencing technology available to researchers worldwide. In recent years, genome sequencing has vastly outpaced the ability to interpret genome function. Fully maximizing this wealth of data will require new technology advancements, along with improvements and an increase in the throughput of existing methods for characterizing molecular- to cellular-level processes important for inferring biological function. BSSD research seeks to understand the fundamental genome-encoded properties of plants and microbes that can be harnessed or redesigned for beneficial purposes. Current emphases are leading to the discovery, development, and understanding of numerous plant and microbial species with traits suitable for the production of fuels and chemical products from renewable biomass that could be grown synergistically with food or animal feed crops while not competing with other societal needs. Additionally, BSSD further supports research leading to an understanding of the complex and essential interactions among plants, microbial communities, and the environment to find new ways to sustainably produce biomass for a range of bioenergy and bioproduct applications. This research also is relevant for incorporation into larger-scale environmental models such as those developed through the research supported by BER’s Earth and Environmental Systems Sciences programs.},
doi = {10.2172/1471216},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}