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Title: Coincident aboveground and belowground autonomous monitoring to quantify covariability in permafrost, soil, and vegetation properties in Arctic tundra

Abstract

Coincident monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution of and interactions between land, soil, and permafrost properties is important for advancing our understanding of ecosystem dynamics. In this paper, a novel monitoring strategy was developed to quantify complex Arctic ecosystem responses to the seasonal freeze-thaw-growing season conditions. The strategy exploited autonomous measurements obtained through electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil properties, pole-mounted optical cameras to monitor vegetation dynamics, point probes to measure soil temperature, and periodic manual measurements of thaw layer thickness, snow thickness, and soil dielectric permittivity. The spatially and temporally dense monitoring data sets revealed several insights about tundra system behavior at a site located near Barrow, AK. In the active layer, the soil electrical conductivity (a proxy for soil water content) indicated an increasing positive correlation with the green chromatic coordinate (a proxy for vegetation vigor) over the growing season, with the strongest correlation (R = 0.89) near the typical peak of the growing season. Soil conductivity and green chromatic coordinate also showed significant positive correlations with thaw depth, which is influenced by soil and surface properties. In the permafrost, soil electrical conductivity revealed annual variations in solute concentration and unfrozen water content, even at temperatures well below 0°Cmore » in saline permafrost. These conditions may contribute to an acceleration of long-term thaw in Coastal permafrost regions. Finally, demonstration of this first aboveground and belowground geophysical monitoring approach within an Arctic ecosystem illustrates its significant potential to remotely “visualize” permafrost, soil, and vegetation ecosystem codynamics in high resolution over field relevant scales.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1471034
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1402392
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-8953
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; permafrost; Arctic; soil moisture; codynamics; subsurface imaging; aerial imaging

Citation Formats

Dafflon, Baptiste, Oktem, Rusen, Peterson, John, Ulrich, Craig, Tran, Anh Phuong, Romanovsky, Vladimir, and Hubbard, Susan S. Coincident aboveground and belowground autonomous monitoring to quantify covariability in permafrost, soil, and vegetation properties in Arctic tundra. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016JG003724.
Dafflon, Baptiste, Oktem, Rusen, Peterson, John, Ulrich, Craig, Tran, Anh Phuong, Romanovsky, Vladimir, & Hubbard, Susan S. Coincident aboveground and belowground autonomous monitoring to quantify covariability in permafrost, soil, and vegetation properties in Arctic tundra. United States. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JG003724
Dafflon, Baptiste, Oktem, Rusen, Peterson, John, Ulrich, Craig, Tran, Anh Phuong, Romanovsky, Vladimir, and Hubbard, Susan S. Sat . "Coincident aboveground and belowground autonomous monitoring to quantify covariability in permafrost, soil, and vegetation properties in Arctic tundra". United States. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JG003724. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1471034.
@article{osti_1471034,
title = {Coincident aboveground and belowground autonomous monitoring to quantify covariability in permafrost, soil, and vegetation properties in Arctic tundra},
author = {Dafflon, Baptiste and Oktem, Rusen and Peterson, John and Ulrich, Craig and Tran, Anh Phuong and Romanovsky, Vladimir and Hubbard, Susan S.},
abstractNote = {Coincident monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution of and interactions between land, soil, and permafrost properties is important for advancing our understanding of ecosystem dynamics. In this paper, a novel monitoring strategy was developed to quantify complex Arctic ecosystem responses to the seasonal freeze-thaw-growing season conditions. The strategy exploited autonomous measurements obtained through electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil properties, pole-mounted optical cameras to monitor vegetation dynamics, point probes to measure soil temperature, and periodic manual measurements of thaw layer thickness, snow thickness, and soil dielectric permittivity. The spatially and temporally dense monitoring data sets revealed several insights about tundra system behavior at a site located near Barrow, AK. In the active layer, the soil electrical conductivity (a proxy for soil water content) indicated an increasing positive correlation with the green chromatic coordinate (a proxy for vegetation vigor) over the growing season, with the strongest correlation (R = 0.89) near the typical peak of the growing season. Soil conductivity and green chromatic coordinate also showed significant positive correlations with thaw depth, which is influenced by soil and surface properties. In the permafrost, soil electrical conductivity revealed annual variations in solute concentration and unfrozen water content, even at temperatures well below 0°C in saline permafrost. These conditions may contribute to an acceleration of long-term thaw in Coastal permafrost regions. Finally, demonstration of this first aboveground and belowground geophysical monitoring approach within an Arctic ecosystem illustrates its significant potential to remotely “visualize” permafrost, soil, and vegetation ecosystem codynamics in high resolution over field relevant scales.},
doi = {10.1002/2016JG003724},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1471034}, journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences},
issn = {2169-8953},
number = 6,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Investigating Microtopographic and Soil Controls on a Mountainous Meadow Plant Community Using High‐Resolution Remote Sensing and Surface Geophysical Data
    journal, June 2019


    Modeling Climate Change Impacts on an Arctic Polygonal Tundra: 1. Rates of Permafrost Thaw Depend on Changes in Vegetation and Drainage
    journal, May 2019


    Mountain permafrost degradation documented through a network of permanent electrical resistivity tomography sites
    journal, January 2019


    Analysis of landscape evolution in a vulnerable coastal area under natural and human pressure
    journal, January 2018