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Title: Robotic removal of zebra mussel accumulations in a nuclear power plant screenhouse

Abstract

Zebra mussel accumulations in the power plant intake system have increased over the last four years and have become a maintenance issue. Several treatment methods have been used, including mechanical cleaning by divers. This is limited to areas of relatively low flow velocity. Various sections of the screenhouse are not accessible except during an outage or when one of the intake tunnels can be otherwise be blocked and flow reduced. In addition, diver services are relatively costly. For the above reasons, the Indiana Michigan Power Co., Cook Nuclear Plant, contracted with ARD Environmental Inc. to develop and test a robotic system as an alternative to cleaning by divers. The first phase of this project addressed the requirement to clean the screenhouse floor in all areas, including those with high flow velocity. Subsequent phases will address robotic cleaning of other areas of the intake and the screenhouse structures. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Demonstrate the ability to deploy and retrieve a modified XT1000 vehicle in the inlet bay and screen bays; (2) Remove the accumulations of zebra mussels and possibly other pumpable material from the floor; (3) Reduce or eliminate the need for diver services and reduce overallmore » cost of removing accumulations of zebra mussels; and, (4) Critique operations and develop recommendations for further enhancements to the robotic equipment and materials handling system. Implementation of the operating plan commenced on September 8, 1994, and was completed on October 7, 1994. The project demonstrated that robotic techniques are an efficient and cost effective alternative to diver operations for mechanical removal of zebra mussels. In particular, the robotic system was able to operate effectively in the high flow velocity areas including those at the intake tunnels. The ability to operate in the high flow areas means that zebra mussel removal may take place at any time, without affecting normal plant operations.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];
  1. ARD Environmental, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)
  2. Indiana Michigan Power Co./Cook Nuclear Plant, Bridgman, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
146962
Report Number(s):
EPRI-TR-105116; CONF-9502124-
TRN: 96:005754
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: 5. international Zebra mussel and other aquatic nuisance organisms conference, Toronto (Canada), 14-21 Feb 1995; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the fifth international zebra mussel and other aquatic nuisance organisms conference 1995; Ackerman, J.D. [Univ. of Northern British Columbia, Prince George (Canada)]; PB: 494 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COOK-1 REACTOR; INTAKE STRUCTURES; COOK-2 REACTOR; MUSSELS; REMOVAL; BIOLOGICAL FOULING; ROBOTS; IMAGES; NUMERICAL DATA

Citation Formats

Kotler, S.R., Mallen, E.C., and Tamms, K.M. Robotic removal of zebra mussel accumulations in a nuclear power plant screenhouse. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Kotler, S.R., Mallen, E.C., & Tamms, K.M. Robotic removal of zebra mussel accumulations in a nuclear power plant screenhouse. United States.
Kotler, S.R., Mallen, E.C., and Tamms, K.M. 1995. "Robotic removal of zebra mussel accumulations in a nuclear power plant screenhouse". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_146962,
title = {Robotic removal of zebra mussel accumulations in a nuclear power plant screenhouse},
author = {Kotler, S.R. and Mallen, E.C. and Tamms, K.M.},
abstractNote = {Zebra mussel accumulations in the power plant intake system have increased over the last four years and have become a maintenance issue. Several treatment methods have been used, including mechanical cleaning by divers. This is limited to areas of relatively low flow velocity. Various sections of the screenhouse are not accessible except during an outage or when one of the intake tunnels can be otherwise be blocked and flow reduced. In addition, diver services are relatively costly. For the above reasons, the Indiana Michigan Power Co., Cook Nuclear Plant, contracted with ARD Environmental Inc. to develop and test a robotic system as an alternative to cleaning by divers. The first phase of this project addressed the requirement to clean the screenhouse floor in all areas, including those with high flow velocity. Subsequent phases will address robotic cleaning of other areas of the intake and the screenhouse structures. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Demonstrate the ability to deploy and retrieve a modified XT1000 vehicle in the inlet bay and screen bays; (2) Remove the accumulations of zebra mussels and possibly other pumpable material from the floor; (3) Reduce or eliminate the need for diver services and reduce overall cost of removing accumulations of zebra mussels; and, (4) Critique operations and develop recommendations for further enhancements to the robotic equipment and materials handling system. Implementation of the operating plan commenced on September 8, 1994, and was completed on October 7, 1994. The project demonstrated that robotic techniques are an efficient and cost effective alternative to diver operations for mechanical removal of zebra mussels. In particular, the robotic system was able to operate effectively in the high flow velocity areas including those at the intake tunnels. The ability to operate in the high flow areas means that zebra mussel removal may take place at any time, without affecting normal plant operations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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