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Title: Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Plant Root Colonization by Beneficial Bacteria in a Microfluidic Habitat

Abstract

Plant–microbe interactions underpin processes related to soil ecology, plant function, and global carbon cycling. However, quantifying the spatial dynamics of these interactions has proven challenging in natural systems. Currently, microfluidic platforms are at the forefront of innovation for culturing, imaging, and manipulating plants in controlled environments. Using a microfluidic platform to culture plants with beneficial bacteria, visualization and quantification of the spatial dynamics of these interactions during the early stages of plant development is possible. For two plant growth–promoting bacterial isolates, the population of bacterial cells reaches a coverage density of 1–2% of the root's surface at the end of a 4 d observation period regardless of bacterial species or inoculum concentration. The two bacterial species form distinct associations with root tissue through a mechanism that appears to be independent of the presence of the other bacterial species, despite evidence for their competition. Root development changes associated with these bacterial treatments depend on the initial concentrations and species of the bacterial population present. Finally, this microfluidic approach provides context for understanding plant–microbe interactions during the early stages of plant development and can be used to generate new hypotheses about physical and biochemical exchanges between plants and their associated microbial communities.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1468214
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1434072
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; DGE-1452154
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Biosystems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2366-7478
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; colonization kinetics; microfluidics; plant growth–promoting bacteria; plant-on-a-chip; root development

Citation Formats

None, None. Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Plant Root Colonization by Beneficial Bacteria in a Microfluidic Habitat. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/adbi.201800048.
None, None. Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Plant Root Colonization by Beneficial Bacteria in a Microfluidic Habitat. United States. doi:10.1002/adbi.201800048.
None, None. Fri . "Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Plant Root Colonization by Beneficial Bacteria in a Microfluidic Habitat". United States. doi:10.1002/adbi.201800048.
@article{osti_1468214,
title = {Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Plant Root Colonization by Beneficial Bacteria in a Microfluidic Habitat},
author = {None, None},
abstractNote = {Plant–microbe interactions underpin processes related to soil ecology, plant function, and global carbon cycling. However, quantifying the spatial dynamics of these interactions has proven challenging in natural systems. Currently, microfluidic platforms are at the forefront of innovation for culturing, imaging, and manipulating plants in controlled environments. Using a microfluidic platform to culture plants with beneficial bacteria, visualization and quantification of the spatial dynamics of these interactions during the early stages of plant development is possible. For two plant growth–promoting bacterial isolates, the population of bacterial cells reaches a coverage density of 1–2% of the root's surface at the end of a 4 d observation period regardless of bacterial species or inoculum concentration. The two bacterial species form distinct associations with root tissue through a mechanism that appears to be independent of the presence of the other bacterial species, despite evidence for their competition. Root development changes associated with these bacterial treatments depend on the initial concentrations and species of the bacterial population present. Finally, this microfluidic approach provides context for understanding plant–microbe interactions during the early stages of plant development and can be used to generate new hypotheses about physical and biochemical exchanges between plants and their associated microbial communities.},
doi = {10.1002/adbi.201800048},
journal = {Advanced Biosystems},
number = 6,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Fri Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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