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Title: Review of Inorganic Salt Hydrates with Phase Change Temperature in Range of 5°C to 60°C and Material Cost Comparison with Common Waxes

Abstract

Phase change materials (PCMs) with desirable phase change temperatures can be used to provide a constant temperature thermal source or sink for diverse applications. As such, incorporating PCMs into building materials, equipment, or appliances can shift and/or reduce the energy load. The motivation of this work is to identify low-cost inorganic salt hydrate PCMs that can complement current building systems and designs, and compare them with common paraffins.In this work, we analyzed inorganic salt hydrates with phase change temperatures in the range of 5-60°C, to target both space heating and cooling applications. The properties of the salt hydrates were compared with paraffins over the same temperature range. The results showed that PCMs with a melting temperature above 20°C, salt hydrates have advantages over paraffins including higher thermal energy density (45-120 kWh/m3 for salt hydrates; 45-60 kWh/m3 for paraffins) and generally lower material energy cost (1-20 $/kWh for salt hydrates; 20-30 $/kWh for comparable paraffins). For PCMs with a melting temperature less than 20°C, the material cost is higher for both salt hydrates and paraffins (30-110 $/kWh for both classes of materials) and salt hydrates retain their advantage of greater thermal energy density (50-120 kWh/m3 for salt hydrates; 45-60 kWh/m3 formore » paraffins). In all cases, factors including thermal cyclability, stability, congruency, corrosion, and supercooling must be considered when comparing paraffins and salt hydrates for a particular application. Finally, we give an overview of enhancement techniques for salt hydrate PCMs and find that limited efforts have been pursued to tune salt hydrate phase change temperatures, with a wider range of studies investigating stabilization and minimization of supercooling. This analysis shows the potential of developing salt hydrate PCMs for low-cost heating and cooling thermal energy storage systems for a range of applications.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Georgia Tech
  2. ORNL
  3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1468092
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 5th International High Performance Buildings Conference at Purdue, July 9-12, 2018 - West Lafayette, Indiana, United States of America - -
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hirschey, Jason, Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Mallow, Anne, and Graham, Samuel. Review of Inorganic Salt Hydrates with Phase Change Temperature in Range of 5°C to 60°C and Material Cost Comparison with Common Waxes. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Hirschey, Jason, Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Mallow, Anne, & Graham, Samuel. Review of Inorganic Salt Hydrates with Phase Change Temperature in Range of 5°C to 60°C and Material Cost Comparison with Common Waxes. United States.
Hirschey, Jason, Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Mallow, Anne, and Graham, Samuel. Sun . "Review of Inorganic Salt Hydrates with Phase Change Temperature in Range of 5°C to 60°C and Material Cost Comparison with Common Waxes". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468092.
@article{osti_1468092,
title = {Review of Inorganic Salt Hydrates with Phase Change Temperature in Range of 5°C to 60°C and Material Cost Comparison with Common Waxes},
author = {Hirschey, Jason and Gluesenkamp, Kyle R. and Mallow, Anne and Graham, Samuel},
abstractNote = {Phase change materials (PCMs) with desirable phase change temperatures can be used to provide a constant temperature thermal source or sink for diverse applications. As such, incorporating PCMs into building materials, equipment, or appliances can shift and/or reduce the energy load. The motivation of this work is to identify low-cost inorganic salt hydrate PCMs that can complement current building systems and designs, and compare them with common paraffins.In this work, we analyzed inorganic salt hydrates with phase change temperatures in the range of 5-60°C, to target both space heating and cooling applications. The properties of the salt hydrates were compared with paraffins over the same temperature range. The results showed that PCMs with a melting temperature above 20°C, salt hydrates have advantages over paraffins including higher thermal energy density (45-120 kWh/m3 for salt hydrates; 45-60 kWh/m3 for paraffins) and generally lower material energy cost (1-20 $/kWh for salt hydrates; 20-30 $/kWh for comparable paraffins). For PCMs with a melting temperature less than 20°C, the material cost is higher for both salt hydrates and paraffins (30-110 $/kWh for both classes of materials) and salt hydrates retain their advantage of greater thermal energy density (50-120 kWh/m3 for salt hydrates; 45-60 kWh/m3 for paraffins). In all cases, factors including thermal cyclability, stability, congruency, corrosion, and supercooling must be considered when comparing paraffins and salt hydrates for a particular application. Finally, we give an overview of enhancement techniques for salt hydrate PCMs and find that limited efforts have been pursued to tune salt hydrate phase change temperatures, with a wider range of studies investigating stabilization and minimization of supercooling. This analysis shows the potential of developing salt hydrate PCMs for low-cost heating and cooling thermal energy storage systems for a range of applications.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
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