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Title: Trace Analysis and Reaction Monitoring by Nanophotonic Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Elevated Bowtie and Silicon Nanopost Arrays

Abstract

We present that silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) are used in trace analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) because they enable highly efficient ion production from small molecules and thin tissue sections by UV laser desorption ionization (LDI). Such nanophotonic ionization of adsorbates relies on localized interactions between a nanostructured substrate and laser radiation. In LDI from NAPA, only the component of the oscillating electric field vector that is parallel with the posts couples the laser energy into the nanostructure. Enhancements in control over adsorbate ionization and fragmentation are expected if the surface-parallel component can also interact with the nanostructure. Here, an alternative nanophotonic ionization platform is introduced for LDI-MS, the elevated bowtie (EBT) array by adding triangular chromium features on top of silicon post pairs to form bowties. Compared to NAPA, the threshold fluence for ionization from EBT is lower, and at low laser fluences the ionization efficiency is increased by a factor of ≈17. The EBT platform with optimized apex angle exhibits a higher survival yield for molecular ions produced from biomolecules and xenobiotics and allows more control over fragmentation by adjusting the fluence. Finally, these unique nanophotonic ionization attributes are utilized for trace analysis and reaction monitoring in complexmore » biological samples.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Department of Chemistry
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS) and Biosciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1468089
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1438491
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; FG02-01ER15129; W911NF-14-2-0020; CNMS2013-309
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Functional Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 29; Journal ID: ISSN 1616-301X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; bowtie arrays; laser desorption; mass spectrometry; nanophotonic ionization; nanopost arrays

Citation Formats

A. Stopka, Sylwia, A. Holmes, Xavier, Korte, Andrew R., R. Compton, Laine, Retterer, Scott T., and Vertes, Akos. Trace Analysis and Reaction Monitoring by Nanophotonic Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Elevated Bowtie and Silicon Nanopost Arrays. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/adfm.201801730.
A. Stopka, Sylwia, A. Holmes, Xavier, Korte, Andrew R., R. Compton, Laine, Retterer, Scott T., & Vertes, Akos. Trace Analysis and Reaction Monitoring by Nanophotonic Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Elevated Bowtie and Silicon Nanopost Arrays. United States. doi:10.1002/adfm.201801730.
A. Stopka, Sylwia, A. Holmes, Xavier, Korte, Andrew R., R. Compton, Laine, Retterer, Scott T., and Vertes, Akos. Tue . "Trace Analysis and Reaction Monitoring by Nanophotonic Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Elevated Bowtie and Silicon Nanopost Arrays". United States. doi:10.1002/adfm.201801730. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468089.
@article{osti_1468089,
title = {Trace Analysis and Reaction Monitoring by Nanophotonic Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Elevated Bowtie and Silicon Nanopost Arrays},
author = {A. Stopka, Sylwia and A. Holmes, Xavier and Korte, Andrew R. and R. Compton, Laine and Retterer, Scott T. and Vertes, Akos},
abstractNote = {We present that silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) are used in trace analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) because they enable highly efficient ion production from small molecules and thin tissue sections by UV laser desorption ionization (LDI). Such nanophotonic ionization of adsorbates relies on localized interactions between a nanostructured substrate and laser radiation. In LDI from NAPA, only the component of the oscillating electric field vector that is parallel with the posts couples the laser energy into the nanostructure. Enhancements in control over adsorbate ionization and fragmentation are expected if the surface-parallel component can also interact with the nanostructure. Here, an alternative nanophotonic ionization platform is introduced for LDI-MS, the elevated bowtie (EBT) array by adding triangular chromium features on top of silicon post pairs to form bowties. Compared to NAPA, the threshold fluence for ionization from EBT is lower, and at low laser fluences the ionization efficiency is increased by a factor of ≈17. The EBT platform with optimized apex angle exhibits a higher survival yield for molecular ions produced from biomolecules and xenobiotics and allows more control over fragmentation by adjusting the fluence. Finally, these unique nanophotonic ionization attributes are utilized for trace analysis and reaction monitoring in complex biological samples.},
doi = {10.1002/adfm.201801730},
journal = {Advanced Functional Materials},
issn = {1616-301X},
number = 29,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

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