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Title: Evaporation-induced monolayer compression improves droplet interface bilayer formation using unsaturated lipids

Abstract

In this paper, we report on a new experimental methodology to enable reliable formation of droplet interface bilayer (DIB) model membranes with two types of unsaturated lipids that have proven difficult for creating stable DIBs. Through the implementation of a simple evaporation technique to condition the spontaneously assembled lipid monolayer around each droplet, we increased the success rates of DIB formation for two distinct unsaturated lipids, namely 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), from less than 10% to near 100%. Separately, using a pendant drop tensiometer, we learned that: (a) DOPC and POPC monolayers do not spontaneously assemble into their tightest possible configurations at an oil-water interface, and (b) reducing the surface area of a water droplet coated with a partially packed monolayer leads to a more tightly packed monolayer with an interfacial tension lower than that achieved by spontaneous assembly alone. We also estimated from Langmuir compression isotherms obtained for both lipids that the brief droplet evaporation procedure prior to DIB formation resulted in a 6%–16% reduction in area per lipid for DOPC and POPC, respectively. Lastly, the increased success rates of formation for DOPC and POPC DIBs enabled quantitative characterization of unsaturated lipid membrane properties including electrical resistance, rupturemore » potential, and specific capacitance.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering and Bredesen Center; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Joint Institute for Biological Sciences
  3. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Joint Institute for Biological Sciences and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1468062
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Biomicrofluidics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-1058
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Venkatesan, Guru A., Taylor, Graham J., Basham, Colin M., Brady, Nathan G., Collier, C. Patrick, and Sarles, Stephen A.. Evaporation-induced monolayer compression improves droplet interface bilayer formation using unsaturated lipids. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5016523.
Venkatesan, Guru A., Taylor, Graham J., Basham, Colin M., Brady, Nathan G., Collier, C. Patrick, & Sarles, Stephen A.. Evaporation-induced monolayer compression improves droplet interface bilayer formation using unsaturated lipids. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5016523.
Venkatesan, Guru A., Taylor, Graham J., Basham, Colin M., Brady, Nathan G., Collier, C. Patrick, and Sarles, Stephen A.. Thu . "Evaporation-induced monolayer compression improves droplet interface bilayer formation using unsaturated lipids". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5016523.
@article{osti_1468062,
title = {Evaporation-induced monolayer compression improves droplet interface bilayer formation using unsaturated lipids},
author = {Venkatesan, Guru A. and Taylor, Graham J. and Basham, Colin M. and Brady, Nathan G. and Collier, C. Patrick and Sarles, Stephen A.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we report on a new experimental methodology to enable reliable formation of droplet interface bilayer (DIB) model membranes with two types of unsaturated lipids that have proven difficult for creating stable DIBs. Through the implementation of a simple evaporation technique to condition the spontaneously assembled lipid monolayer around each droplet, we increased the success rates of DIB formation for two distinct unsaturated lipids, namely 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), from less than 10% to near 100%. Separately, using a pendant drop tensiometer, we learned that: (a) DOPC and POPC monolayers do not spontaneously assemble into their tightest possible configurations at an oil-water interface, and (b) reducing the surface area of a water droplet coated with a partially packed monolayer leads to a more tightly packed monolayer with an interfacial tension lower than that achieved by spontaneous assembly alone. We also estimated from Langmuir compression isotherms obtained for both lipids that the brief droplet evaporation procedure prior to DIB formation resulted in a 6%–16% reduction in area per lipid for DOPC and POPC, respectively. Lastly, the increased success rates of formation for DOPC and POPC DIBs enabled quantitative characterization of unsaturated lipid membrane properties including electrical resistance, rupture potential, and specific capacitance.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5016523},
journal = {Biomicrofluidics},
issn = {1932-1058},
number = 2,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}