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Title: Biotic responses buffer warming-induced soil organic carbon loss in Arctic tundra

Abstract

Climate warming can result in both abiotic (e.g., permafrost thaw) and biotic (e.g., microbial functional genes) changes in Arctic tundra. Recent research has incorporated dynamic permafrost thaw in Earth system models (ESMs) and indicates that Arctic tundra could be a significant future carbon (C) source due to the enhanced decomposition of thawed deep soil C. However, warming-induced biotic changes may influence biologically related parameters and the consequent projections in ESMs. How model parameters associated with biotic responses will change under warming and to what extent these changes affect projected C budgets have not been carefully examined. Here in this study, we synthesized six data sets over 5 years from a soil warming experiment at the Eight Mile Lake, Alaska, into the Terrestrial ECOsystem (TECO) model with a probabilistic inversion approach. The TECO model used multiple soil layers to track dynamics of thawed soil under different treatments. Our results show that warming increased light use efficiency of vegetation photosynthesis but decreased baseline (i.e., environment-corrected) turnover rates of SOC in both the fast and slow pools in comparison with those under control. Moreover, the parameter changes generally amplified over time, suggesting processes of gradual physiological acclimation and functional gene shifts of bothmore » plants and microbes. The TECO model predicted that field warming from 2009 to 2013 resulted in cumulative C losses of 224 or 87 g/m 2, respectively, without or with changes in those parameters. Thus, warming-induced parameter changes reduced predicted soil C loss by 61%. Our study suggests that it is critical to incorporate biotic changes in ESMs to improve the model performance in predicting C dynamics in permafrost regions.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [5];  [7];  [8]; ORCiD logo [9];  [5];  [10];  [11];  [10];  [12];  [5];  [13]
  1. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Inst.
  2. East China Normal Univ. (ECNU), Shanghai (China). Tiantong National Station of Forest Ecosystem, Research Center for Global Change and Ecological Forecasting, School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences; Inst. of Eco-Chongming (IEC), Shanghai (China)
  3. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology
  4. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Center for Ecosystem Science and Society and Dept. of Biological Sciences
  5. Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Center for Ecosystem Science and Society and Dept. of Biological Sciences
  6. Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA (United States)
  7. Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). College of Integrative Sciences and Arts; Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics, Biodesign Inst.
  8. Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Center for Ecosystem Science and Society and Dept. of Biological Sciences; Univ. Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles (Spain). Dept. de Biologıa y Geologıa, Fısica y Quımica Inorganica, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologıa,; Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ciencias Agrarias
  9. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Inst.
  10. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Center for Microbial Ecology
  11. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and School of Biology
  12. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics; Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). State Key Joint Lab. of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences
  13. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Center for Ecosystem Science and Society and Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Earth System Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1468031
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Global Change Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1354-1013
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; acclimation; biotic responses; carbon modeling; climate warming; data assimilation; permafrost; soil carbon

Citation Formats

Liang, Junyi, Xia, Jiangyang, Shi, Zheng, Jiang, Lifen, Ma, Shuang, Lu, Xingjie, Mauritz, Marguerite, Natali, Susan M., Pegoraro, Elaine, Penton, Christopher Ryan, Plaza, César, Salmon, Verity G., Celis, Gerardo, Cole, James R., Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., Tiedje, James M., Zhou, Jizhong, Schuur, Edward A. G., and Luo, Yiqi. Biotic responses buffer warming-induced soil organic carbon loss in Arctic tundra. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/gcb.14325.
Liang, Junyi, Xia, Jiangyang, Shi, Zheng, Jiang, Lifen, Ma, Shuang, Lu, Xingjie, Mauritz, Marguerite, Natali, Susan M., Pegoraro, Elaine, Penton, Christopher Ryan, Plaza, César, Salmon, Verity G., Celis, Gerardo, Cole, James R., Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., Tiedje, James M., Zhou, Jizhong, Schuur, Edward A. G., & Luo, Yiqi. Biotic responses buffer warming-induced soil organic carbon loss in Arctic tundra. United States. doi:10.1111/gcb.14325.
Liang, Junyi, Xia, Jiangyang, Shi, Zheng, Jiang, Lifen, Ma, Shuang, Lu, Xingjie, Mauritz, Marguerite, Natali, Susan M., Pegoraro, Elaine, Penton, Christopher Ryan, Plaza, César, Salmon, Verity G., Celis, Gerardo, Cole, James R., Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., Tiedje, James M., Zhou, Jizhong, Schuur, Edward A. G., and Luo, Yiqi. Sat . "Biotic responses buffer warming-induced soil organic carbon loss in Arctic tundra". United States. doi:10.1111/gcb.14325.
@article{osti_1468031,
title = {Biotic responses buffer warming-induced soil organic carbon loss in Arctic tundra},
author = {Liang, Junyi and Xia, Jiangyang and Shi, Zheng and Jiang, Lifen and Ma, Shuang and Lu, Xingjie and Mauritz, Marguerite and Natali, Susan M. and Pegoraro, Elaine and Penton, Christopher Ryan and Plaza, César and Salmon, Verity G. and Celis, Gerardo and Cole, James R. and Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T. and Tiedje, James M. and Zhou, Jizhong and Schuur, Edward A. G. and Luo, Yiqi},
abstractNote = {Climate warming can result in both abiotic (e.g., permafrost thaw) and biotic (e.g., microbial functional genes) changes in Arctic tundra. Recent research has incorporated dynamic permafrost thaw in Earth system models (ESMs) and indicates that Arctic tundra could be a significant future carbon (C) source due to the enhanced decomposition of thawed deep soil C. However, warming-induced biotic changes may influence biologically related parameters and the consequent projections in ESMs. How model parameters associated with biotic responses will change under warming and to what extent these changes affect projected C budgets have not been carefully examined. Here in this study, we synthesized six data sets over 5 years from a soil warming experiment at the Eight Mile Lake, Alaska, into the Terrestrial ECOsystem (TECO) model with a probabilistic inversion approach. The TECO model used multiple soil layers to track dynamics of thawed soil under different treatments. Our results show that warming increased light use efficiency of vegetation photosynthesis but decreased baseline (i.e., environment-corrected) turnover rates of SOC in both the fast and slow pools in comparison with those under control. Moreover, the parameter changes generally amplified over time, suggesting processes of gradual physiological acclimation and functional gene shifts of both plants and microbes. The TECO model predicted that field warming from 2009 to 2013 resulted in cumulative C losses of 224 or 87 g/m2, respectively, without or with changes in those parameters. Thus, warming-induced parameter changes reduced predicted soil C loss by 61%. Our study suggests that it is critical to incorporate biotic changes in ESMs to improve the model performance in predicting C dynamics in permafrost regions.},
doi = {10.1111/gcb.14325},
journal = {Global Change Biology},
issn = {1354-1013},
number = 10,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}