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Title: Rattlesnake Theory Manual

Abstract

Rattlesnake is the MOOSE [1, 2] (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) based application for simulating the physics of radiation transport. Radiation transport studies the motion of particles, usually neutrons, photons or electrons, etc. and their interactions with background materials [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. The fundamental quantity of interest in radiation transport is the statistically averaged radiation distribution or flux in space (dimentionality 3), time (1), direction of motion (2) and energy (or frequency) (1), forming a seven-dimensional phase space. Various reaction rates are secondary in the sense that they are computed from the primary flux and the background material properties; however, reaction rates are typically more interesting for the analyst or when coupling to other physics, e.g. heat conduction or thermo-hydraulics. Radiation transport calculations receive feedback within a multiphysics environment through temperature and density changes, which predominantly change how radiation particles interact with the background nuclei. Accurate prediction of the flux is essential to the design and operation of nuclear facilities for the purpose of safety and economics. For example in nuclear fission reactors, neutron-induced fissions and the accumulated radiative isotopes are the main heat source. Predicting whether the heat can be removed from the reactor core under allmore » circumstances without violation of safety limits is critical to the safety of nuclear reactors.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1466687
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-17-42103
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Rattlesnake; Multigroup radiation transport; MOOSE-based application; Multiphysics; Multi-scheme

Citation Formats

Wang, Yaqi, Schunert, Sebastian, and Laboure, Vincent. Rattlesnake Theory Manual. United Kingdom: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1466687.
Wang, Yaqi, Schunert, Sebastian, & Laboure, Vincent. Rattlesnake Theory Manual. United Kingdom. doi:10.2172/1466687.
Wang, Yaqi, Schunert, Sebastian, and Laboure, Vincent. Sun . "Rattlesnake Theory Manual". United Kingdom. doi:10.2172/1466687. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466687.
@article{osti_1466687,
title = {Rattlesnake Theory Manual},
author = {Wang, Yaqi and Schunert, Sebastian and Laboure, Vincent},
abstractNote = {Rattlesnake is the MOOSE [1, 2] (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) based application for simulating the physics of radiation transport. Radiation transport studies the motion of particles, usually neutrons, photons or electrons, etc. and their interactions with background materials [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. The fundamental quantity of interest in radiation transport is the statistically averaged radiation distribution or flux in space (dimentionality 3), time (1), direction of motion (2) and energy (or frequency) (1), forming a seven-dimensional phase space. Various reaction rates are secondary in the sense that they are computed from the primary flux and the background material properties; however, reaction rates are typically more interesting for the analyst or when coupling to other physics, e.g. heat conduction or thermo-hydraulics. Radiation transport calculations receive feedback within a multiphysics environment through temperature and density changes, which predominantly change how radiation particles interact with the background nuclei. Accurate prediction of the flux is essential to the design and operation of nuclear facilities for the purpose of safety and economics. For example in nuclear fission reactors, neutron-induced fissions and the accumulated radiative isotopes are the main heat source. Predicting whether the heat can be removed from the reactor core under all circumstances without violation of safety limits is critical to the safety of nuclear reactors.},
doi = {10.2172/1466687},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

Technical Report:

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