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Title: Collaborative Project: Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles. Final Report

Abstract

New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species and more volatile gases that react in particles to form stable compounds, from diameters of ~1 nm to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. At the present time there are uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in model predictions of aerosol-climate interactions. In this project, we used a combination of field, laboratory, and modelling studies to understand the processes leading to nanoparticle growth and evaluated and improved growth in global aerosol models. During this period this research team has either participated in, or analyzed observations from, four DOE-funded campaigns: the 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site; the 2013 Biogenic Aerosols – Effects on Clouds and Climate campaign (BAECC) in Hyytiala, Finland; Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) in central Amazonia, Brazil; and, most recently, the 2016 Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign at the SGPmore » site. In addition, the research team explored nanoparticle growth mechanisms in laboratory experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, University of California, Irvine, and the CLOUD chamber in Geneva, Switzerland. Modeling efforts resulted in a process-level model that incorporated both salt formation and the uptake of low-volatility organic compounds, which was able to connect measurements of gas and nanoparticle phase compounds observed during NPFS. In total, the results of this work have been described in 32 peer-reviewed publications and 34 invited or conference presentations.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
  2. Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1466047
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCI-SC-0014469
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0014469
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; atmospheric chemistry, new particle formation, nanoparticle growth

Citation Formats

Smith, James, and Pierce, Jeff. Collaborative Project: Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles. Final Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1466047.
Smith, James, & Pierce, Jeff. Collaborative Project: Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles. Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1466047.
Smith, James, and Pierce, Jeff. Thu . "Collaborative Project: Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles. Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1466047. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466047.
@article{osti_1466047,
title = {Collaborative Project: Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles. Final Report},
author = {Smith, James and Pierce, Jeff},
abstractNote = {New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species and more volatile gases that react in particles to form stable compounds, from diameters of ~1 nm to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. At the present time there are uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in model predictions of aerosol-climate interactions. In this project, we used a combination of field, laboratory, and modelling studies to understand the processes leading to nanoparticle growth and evaluated and improved growth in global aerosol models. During this period this research team has either participated in, or analyzed observations from, four DOE-funded campaigns: the 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site; the 2013 Biogenic Aerosols – Effects on Clouds and Climate campaign (BAECC) in Hyytiala, Finland; Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) in central Amazonia, Brazil; and, most recently, the 2016 Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign at the SGP site. In addition, the research team explored nanoparticle growth mechanisms in laboratory experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, University of California, Irvine, and the CLOUD chamber in Geneva, Switzerland. Modeling efforts resulted in a process-level model that incorporated both salt formation and the uptake of low-volatility organic compounds, which was able to connect measurements of gas and nanoparticle phase compounds observed during NPFS. In total, the results of this work have been described in 32 peer-reviewed publications and 34 invited or conference presentations.},
doi = {10.2172/1466047},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}