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Title: Analysis of seismicity at observed at station BCE using subspace detectors

Abstract

A dynamic correlation processor (DCP) was used to process 90 days of 3-component seismic data recorded by station BCE. Two methods of detector creation were compared. The first attempted to span the signal space with a small number of subspace detectors having minimal projections on one another, and the second used a much larger number of detectors with substantial inter-template projections. After two passes over the data the results were compared, and the second approach was found to have produced more than 3 times the number of detections. For events in common, the average correlation statistic for the second approach was 0.77 compared to a statistic of 0.65 for the first approach. Also, analysis of the detection statistics as a function of SNR showed a strong functional relationship between SNR and correlation statistic for the second approach not found in the first approach. I interpret this to mean that the intra-group variability of signals produced by the second method is due primarily to noise rather than variations in source or path. These results show that (in an environment with large numbers of repeaters) if precise classification is a goal, it is better to operate a DCP with many correlators withmore » substantial inter-template projections and that fully span the signal space. The performance of the DCP was also measured using a small set of “ground truth” picks for BCE from the Chip Brogan catalog. The catalog spanned less than three days out of the 90 days of the experiment and is also incomplete, but the comparison identified 12 signals missed by the DCP because of low SNR. Combining detections by the DCP and picks from the Brogan catalog, identifies 76 unique signals. Of these, the DCP detected 64 (84%) and the Catalog contained between 48/76 (63%) and 48/62 (77%). Analysis of time-of-day and day-of-week statistics was not useful in identifying the signal sources. However, magnitude recurrence statistics were consistent with mining induced seismicity (a preponderance of small sources). Failure of the temporal discriminants may indicate that the events being detected are not coupled in the same way to the mining activity, e.g. secondary failures. Correlation data from explosions at the Nevada test site (NTS) were used to bound the separation of events within groups. Nearly all the NTS correlations with the same passband and time bandwidth product as the detections and having a correlation statistic >= 0.8 are from sources separated by less than 1 km. Even at correlation values of 0.6 nearly all the source separations are less than about 3 km. Because the DCP detectors were formed to span the signal space at a correlation value of 0.9 and because the intra-group variability is most likely due to noise and not source variability, it is likely that the sources associated with each detector are separated by one km or less, and almost certain that the majority are separated by no more than 3 km.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1465287
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-754891
941413
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Dodge, Douglas A. Analysis of seismicity at observed at station BCE using subspace detectors. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1465287.
Dodge, Douglas A. Analysis of seismicity at observed at station BCE using subspace detectors. United States. doi:10.2172/1465287.
Dodge, Douglas A. Tue . "Analysis of seismicity at observed at station BCE using subspace detectors". United States. doi:10.2172/1465287. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1465287.
@article{osti_1465287,
title = {Analysis of seismicity at observed at station BCE using subspace detectors},
author = {Dodge, Douglas A.},
abstractNote = {A dynamic correlation processor (DCP) was used to process 90 days of 3-component seismic data recorded by station BCE. Two methods of detector creation were compared. The first attempted to span the signal space with a small number of subspace detectors having minimal projections on one another, and the second used a much larger number of detectors with substantial inter-template projections. After two passes over the data the results were compared, and the second approach was found to have produced more than 3 times the number of detections. For events in common, the average correlation statistic for the second approach was 0.77 compared to a statistic of 0.65 for the first approach. Also, analysis of the detection statistics as a function of SNR showed a strong functional relationship between SNR and correlation statistic for the second approach not found in the first approach. I interpret this to mean that the intra-group variability of signals produced by the second method is due primarily to noise rather than variations in source or path. These results show that (in an environment with large numbers of repeaters) if precise classification is a goal, it is better to operate a DCP with many correlators with substantial inter-template projections and that fully span the signal space. The performance of the DCP was also measured using a small set of “ground truth” picks for BCE from the Chip Brogan catalog. The catalog spanned less than three days out of the 90 days of the experiment and is also incomplete, but the comparison identified 12 signals missed by the DCP because of low SNR. Combining detections by the DCP and picks from the Brogan catalog, identifies 76 unique signals. Of these, the DCP detected 64 (84%) and the Catalog contained between 48/76 (63%) and 48/62 (77%). Analysis of time-of-day and day-of-week statistics was not useful in identifying the signal sources. However, magnitude recurrence statistics were consistent with mining induced seismicity (a preponderance of small sources). Failure of the temporal discriminants may indicate that the events being detected are not coupled in the same way to the mining activity, e.g. secondary failures. Correlation data from explosions at the Nevada test site (NTS) were used to bound the separation of events within groups. Nearly all the NTS correlations with the same passband and time bandwidth product as the detections and having a correlation statistic >= 0.8 are from sources separated by less than 1 km. Even at correlation values of 0.6 nearly all the source separations are less than about 3 km. Because the DCP detectors were formed to span the signal space at a correlation value of 0.9 and because the intra-group variability is most likely due to noise and not source variability, it is likely that the sources associated with each detector are separated by one km or less, and almost certain that the majority are separated by no more than 3 km.},
doi = {10.2172/1465287},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}