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Title: Friction Stir Scribe Joining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) to Aluminum

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to develop the critical process technology, models, and tools necessary to advance the Friction Stir Scribe, FSS, joining method through experimentation, validation at the laboratory scale, and integration into a production-like robotic environment. Implementation of FSS technology for joining polymer composites to metals will enable greater use of lightweight materials by providing technology capable of joining linear configurations without the use of adhesives or other third-body fasteners by creating an in-situ joint from the parent materials. As FSS technology provides the capability to join multi-material structures on robotic platforms using linear configurations, the development of this technology for use on the BIW will impact a great diversity of CFRP joints within the vehicle; thus, allowing a greater reduction in vehicle mass through more specifically designed structures. The FSS process has been developed to include integration of the FSS tool with a stationary shoulder, which has been shown to be required to achieve the desired surface quality (i.e., crown flash level). However, the targeted joint strength has not been achieved because the resulting stirred CFRP microstructure does not provide similar performance as the as-molded composite leading to low fracture strengths despite our efforts investigating variousmore » unique alternative approaches. In support of the experimental work, a process-structure model was developed and validated for the FSS joining (FSSJ) process using surrogate materials (steel and Al). The cyclic corrosion testing of the FSS joints and self-piercing riveted (SPR) joints revealed different modes of galvanic corrosion in the two types of joints. The SPR samples exhibited a greater amount of corrosion on the external surfaces. The presence of steel rivets in these joints exacerbated the situation, with the rivets getting preferentially corroded. The FSSJ samples despite exhibiting less surface corrosion, exhibited severe corrosion under the joint overlap area.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. General Motors Co. (GM) Global R&D, Warren, MI (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
  3. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
General Motors Co. (GM) Global R&D, Warren, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
Contributing Org.:
Arconic, New York City, NY (United States); PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Autodesk, Inc., San Rafael, CA (United States); Livermore Software Technology Corp. (LSTC), Livermore, CA (United States); KUKA Robotics Corp., Shelby Charter Township, MI (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1464600
Report Number(s):
DOE-GMLLC-07311
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0007311
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; material joining; carbon fiber; aluminum; friction stir scribe; CFRP

Citation Formats

Carlson, Blair E., Ollett, David, and Kleinbaum, Sarah. Friction Stir Scribe Joining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) to Aluminum. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1464600.
Carlson, Blair E., Ollett, David, & Kleinbaum, Sarah. Friction Stir Scribe Joining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) to Aluminum. United States. doi:10.2172/1464600.
Carlson, Blair E., Ollett, David, and Kleinbaum, Sarah. Wed . "Friction Stir Scribe Joining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) to Aluminum". United States. doi:10.2172/1464600. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1464600.
@article{osti_1464600,
title = {Friction Stir Scribe Joining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) to Aluminum},
author = {Carlson, Blair E. and Ollett, David and Kleinbaum, Sarah},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this project was to develop the critical process technology, models, and tools necessary to advance the Friction Stir Scribe, FSS, joining method through experimentation, validation at the laboratory scale, and integration into a production-like robotic environment. Implementation of FSS technology for joining polymer composites to metals will enable greater use of lightweight materials by providing technology capable of joining linear configurations without the use of adhesives or other third-body fasteners by creating an in-situ joint from the parent materials. As FSS technology provides the capability to join multi-material structures on robotic platforms using linear configurations, the development of this technology for use on the BIW will impact a great diversity of CFRP joints within the vehicle; thus, allowing a greater reduction in vehicle mass through more specifically designed structures. The FSS process has been developed to include integration of the FSS tool with a stationary shoulder, which has been shown to be required to achieve the desired surface quality (i.e., crown flash level). However, the targeted joint strength has not been achieved because the resulting stirred CFRP microstructure does not provide similar performance as the as-molded composite leading to low fracture strengths despite our efforts investigating various unique alternative approaches. In support of the experimental work, a process-structure model was developed and validated for the FSS joining (FSSJ) process using surrogate materials (steel and Al). The cyclic corrosion testing of the FSS joints and self-piercing riveted (SPR) joints revealed different modes of galvanic corrosion in the two types of joints. The SPR samples exhibited a greater amount of corrosion on the external surfaces. The presence of steel rivets in these joints exacerbated the situation, with the rivets getting preferentially corroded. The FSSJ samples despite exhibiting less surface corrosion, exhibited severe corrosion under the joint overlap area.},
doi = {10.2172/1464600},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}