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Title: Low Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

Abstract

This FOA asked for the novel manufacture of SRF cavities, particularly seamless cavities. In our original hypotheses we asked if we could create superconducting niobium deposits using our novel method. We also asked if we could do this for significant economic savings over traditional methods. Our Phase I proposal identified glass as our most likely substrate. Upon a review of the literature and conversations with glass industry experts we came to two conclusions. The first is that a solid glass mold would require extremely long annealing times, up to several days. The second issue concerns the tendency for molten glass to capture air pockets and to stick to the material. Molten glass does not pour out as cleanly as we had hoped. The two substrates that have been most effective have been 6061 Aluminum and PEEK (Polyether Ether Ketone). As an early proof of concept our sub-contractor coated a 2 mm coating of niobium followed by a 200 micron coating of copper onto an aluminum cylinder. Rather than etch out the aluminum we drilled out the center. The niobium adhered to the cylinder extremely well, but the copper has tended to peel off over time.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Jed) [Atlas Bimetal Labs, Inc., Port Townsend, WA (United States)
  2. Atlas Bimetal Labs, Inc., Port Townsend, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Atlas Bimetal Labs, Inc., Port Townsend, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1464213
Report Number(s):
DOE-Atlas-17812
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0017812
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; Additive Manufacturing; SRF Cavities

Citation Formats

Bothell, Justin, and Miller, David Michael. Low Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Bothell, Justin, & Miller, David Michael. Low Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities. United States.
Bothell, Justin, and Miller, David Michael. Tue . "Low Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities". United States.
@article{osti_1464213,
title = {Low Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities},
author = {Bothell, Justin and Miller, David Michael},
abstractNote = {This FOA asked for the novel manufacture of SRF cavities, particularly seamless cavities. In our original hypotheses we asked if we could create superconducting niobium deposits using our novel method. We also asked if we could do this for significant economic savings over traditional methods. Our Phase I proposal identified glass as our most likely substrate. Upon a review of the literature and conversations with glass industry experts we came to two conclusions. The first is that a solid glass mold would require extremely long annealing times, up to several days. The second issue concerns the tendency for molten glass to capture air pockets and to stick to the material. Molten glass does not pour out as cleanly as we had hoped. The two substrates that have been most effective have been 6061 Aluminum and PEEK (Polyether Ether Ketone). As an early proof of concept our sub-contractor coated a 2 mm coating of niobium followed by a 200 micron coating of copper onto an aluminum cylinder. Rather than etch out the aluminum we drilled out the center. The niobium adhered to the cylinder extremely well, but the copper has tended to peel off over time.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as August 13, 2022
Other availability
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