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Title: Influence of Nonwetting Phase Saturation on Dispersivity in Laboratory-Scale Sandy Porous Media

Abstract

Quantification of dispersive mixing is critically important for characterizing and predicting solute transport in porous media. Dispersion is often estimated by fitting to data collected from a nonreactive, conservative tracer test. While this approach may provide quality estimates, the estimate is specific to the site, soil, or experimental conditions in which the test occurred. Currently, there are a limited number of a priori models for estimating dispersivity in fully saturated or air–water systems and no predictive models to account for the presence of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). The overall goal of this paper was to critically assess both established and new models to predict dispersivity based on properties of the porous medium and fluid saturation. To accomplish this, we assembled and reviewed existing laboratory scale dispersivity datasets in sandy porous media. Only 2 of the 10 existing model formulations offer predictive capability (as indicated through Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency [NSE]). This article describes the development of new, empirical models that enhance the ability to predict dispersivity in laboratory-scale water-saturated (NSE increases from 0.40 to 0.83) and air–water (NSE increases from -1.1 to 0.75) systems of sandy porous media. Knowledge of dispersivity under water-saturated conditions further improves prediction of dispersivity in the presencemore » of a nonwetting phase (NSE = 0.90). Finally, the resulting models have utility for systems with transient water saturation, such as those experienced during infiltration and irrigation events, NAPL source depletion, and delivery of foams and emulsions used in site remediation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1463996
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; CMMI-1000714
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Engineering Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1092-8758
Publisher:
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; dispersion; dispersivity; multiphase; solute transport; unsaturated; vadose zone

Citation Formats

Muller, Katherine A., and Ramsburg, C. Andrew. Influence of Nonwetting Phase Saturation on Dispersivity in Laboratory-Scale Sandy Porous Media. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1089/ees.2017.0444.
Muller, Katherine A., & Ramsburg, C. Andrew. Influence of Nonwetting Phase Saturation on Dispersivity in Laboratory-Scale Sandy Porous Media. United States. doi:10.1089/ees.2017.0444.
Muller, Katherine A., and Ramsburg, C. Andrew. Thu . "Influence of Nonwetting Phase Saturation on Dispersivity in Laboratory-Scale Sandy Porous Media". United States. doi:10.1089/ees.2017.0444. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1463996.
@article{osti_1463996,
title = {Influence of Nonwetting Phase Saturation on Dispersivity in Laboratory-Scale Sandy Porous Media},
author = {Muller, Katherine A. and Ramsburg, C. Andrew},
abstractNote = {Quantification of dispersive mixing is critically important for characterizing and predicting solute transport in porous media. Dispersion is often estimated by fitting to data collected from a nonreactive, conservative tracer test. While this approach may provide quality estimates, the estimate is specific to the site, soil, or experimental conditions in which the test occurred. Currently, there are a limited number of a priori models for estimating dispersivity in fully saturated or air–water systems and no predictive models to account for the presence of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). The overall goal of this paper was to critically assess both established and new models to predict dispersivity based on properties of the porous medium and fluid saturation. To accomplish this, we assembled and reviewed existing laboratory scale dispersivity datasets in sandy porous media. Only 2 of the 10 existing model formulations offer predictive capability (as indicated through Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency [NSE]). This article describes the development of new, empirical models that enhance the ability to predict dispersivity in laboratory-scale water-saturated (NSE increases from 0.40 to 0.83) and air–water (NSE increases from -1.1 to 0.75) systems of sandy porous media. Knowledge of dispersivity under water-saturated conditions further improves prediction of dispersivity in the presence of a nonwetting phase (NSE = 0.90). Finally, the resulting models have utility for systems with transient water saturation, such as those experienced during infiltration and irrigation events, NAPL source depletion, and delivery of foams and emulsions used in site remediation.},
doi = {10.1089/ees.2017.0444},
journal = {Environmental Engineering Science},
issn = {1092-8758},
number = 10,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
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