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Title: Visualization of Multi-Dimensional Imaging Data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility

Abstract

With funding provided from the Office of Fusion Energy Science’s program on Diagnostic Systems for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences, the PI and his team have pioneered the development of microwave imaging systems for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. Specifically, electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging [1], a passive radiometric technique, measures electron temperature fluctuations; and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) [2], an active radar imaging technique, measures electron density fluctuations. These microwave imaging diagnostic instruments developed by UC Davis have made important contributions to fusion science in a relatively short period of time from their original installation on DIII-D. The microwave imaging diagnostic technique has matured considerably since the beginning of a fruitful collaboration with DIII-D and PPPL, and has also been adopted at preeminent tokamak facilities worldwide. As discussed in detail in the following, this has continued with the development of revolutionary microwave diagnostic instruments employing monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) system-on-chip (SoC) technology. Specifically, “chip” receivers mounted in liquid crystal polymer (LCP) modules have been demonstrated to dramatically improve the performance of the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system including: 30x improvement in noise temperature thereby permitting absolute 2-D electron temperature images, outstanding shielding against out-of-band interference including microwave burstingmore » which had plagued previous ELM studies using the old quasi-optical mini-lens ECEI system, and independent modules facilitating flexible repair and replacement. Under the “Visualization of multi-dimensional imaging data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility” program, funding was provided for a research scientist postdoc and a Ph.D. student to support physics studies at DIII-D employing these instruments. This endeavor is synergistic with our current grant under the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program on Diagnostic Systems for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. This support considerably increased the scientific output of the diagnostics. The activities were strongly focused in the areas of pedestal and ELM stability, energetic particle confinement, and the early detection and avoidance of tokamak disruptions employing the microwave imaging diagnostic instruments developed under the advanced diagnostics program where imaging of the ELM crash was made possible by the elimination of the interference from the associated microwave “bursts”« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1463896
Report Number(s):
UCD-12551
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012551
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Luhmann, Jr., N. C. Visualization of Multi-Dimensional Imaging Data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1463896.
Luhmann, Jr., N. C. Visualization of Multi-Dimensional Imaging Data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. United States. doi:10.2172/1463896.
Luhmann, Jr., N. C. Mon . "Visualization of Multi-Dimensional Imaging Data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility". United States. doi:10.2172/1463896. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1463896.
@article{osti_1463896,
title = {Visualization of Multi-Dimensional Imaging Data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility},
author = {Luhmann, Jr., N. C.},
abstractNote = {With funding provided from the Office of Fusion Energy Science’s program on Diagnostic Systems for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences, the PI and his team have pioneered the development of microwave imaging systems for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. Specifically, electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging [1], a passive radiometric technique, measures electron temperature fluctuations; and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) [2], an active radar imaging technique, measures electron density fluctuations. These microwave imaging diagnostic instruments developed by UC Davis have made important contributions to fusion science in a relatively short period of time from their original installation on DIII-D. The microwave imaging diagnostic technique has matured considerably since the beginning of a fruitful collaboration with DIII-D and PPPL, and has also been adopted at preeminent tokamak facilities worldwide. As discussed in detail in the following, this has continued with the development of revolutionary microwave diagnostic instruments employing monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) system-on-chip (SoC) technology. Specifically, “chip” receivers mounted in liquid crystal polymer (LCP) modules have been demonstrated to dramatically improve the performance of the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system including: 30x improvement in noise temperature thereby permitting absolute 2-D electron temperature images, outstanding shielding against out-of-band interference including microwave bursting which had plagued previous ELM studies using the old quasi-optical mini-lens ECEI system, and independent modules facilitating flexible repair and replacement. Under the “Visualization of multi-dimensional imaging data for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility” program, funding was provided for a research scientist postdoc and a Ph.D. student to support physics studies at DIII-D employing these instruments. This endeavor is synergistic with our current grant under the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program on Diagnostic Systems for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. This support considerably increased the scientific output of the diagnostics. The activities were strongly focused in the areas of pedestal and ELM stability, energetic particle confinement, and the early detection and avoidance of tokamak disruptions employing the microwave imaging diagnostic instruments developed under the advanced diagnostics program where imaging of the ELM crash was made possible by the elimination of the interference from the associated microwave “bursts”},
doi = {10.2172/1463896},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}