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Title: Disentangling the complexity of permafrost soil by using high resolution profiling of microbial community composition, key functions and respiration rates: High resolution permafrost microbial profile

Abstract

Thawing permafrost can stimulate microbial activity, leading to faster decomposition of formerly preserved organic matter and CO 2 release. Detailed knowledge about the vertical distribution of the responsible microbial community that is changing with increasing soil depth is limited. In this study, we determined the microbial community composition from cores sampled in a high Arctic heath at Svalbard, Norway; spanning from the active layer (AL) into the permafrost layer (PL). A special aim has been on identifying a layer of recently thawed soil, the transition zone (TZ), which might provide new insights into the fate of thawing permafrost. A unique sampling strategy allowed us to observe a diverse and gradually shifting microbial community in the AL, a Bacteroidetes dominated community in the TZ and throughout the PL, a community strongly dominated by a single Actinobacteria family (Intrasporangiaceae). The contrasting abundances of these two taxa caused a community difference of about 60%, just within 3 cm from TZ to PL. We incubated subsamples at about 5°C and measured highest CO 2 production rates under aerobic incubations, yet contrasting for five different layers and correlating to the microbial community composition. This high resolution strategy provides new insights on how microbial communities aremore » structured in permafrost and a better understanding of how they respond to thaw.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [3];  [6]
  1. Bergen Univ. (Norway). Department of Biological Sciences
  2. Aarhus University, Roskilde (Denmark). Department of Environmental Science; Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Department of Biology
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  4. Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, Center for Permafrost (CENPERM)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Bergen Univ. (Norway). Department of Biological Sciences; University Center in Svalbard, UNIS, Longyearbyen (Norway)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1462122
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1462123; OSTI ID: 1476599; OSTI ID: 1496793
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-130170
Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912; ark:/13030/qt5mt359nr
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; permafrost, 16SrRNA sequencing, intrasporangiaceae, greenhouse emissions, CO2, soil profile

Citation Formats

Müller, Oliver, Bang-Andreasen, Toke, White, Richard Allen, Elberling, Bo, Taş, Neslihan, Kneafsey, Timothy, Jansson, Janet K., and Øvreås, Lise. Disentangling the complexity of permafrost soil by using high resolution profiling of microbial community composition, key functions and respiration rates: High resolution permafrost microbial profile. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.14348.
Müller, Oliver, Bang-Andreasen, Toke, White, Richard Allen, Elberling, Bo, Taş, Neslihan, Kneafsey, Timothy, Jansson, Janet K., & Øvreås, Lise. Disentangling the complexity of permafrost soil by using high resolution profiling of microbial community composition, key functions and respiration rates: High resolution permafrost microbial profile. United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.14348.
Müller, Oliver, Bang-Andreasen, Toke, White, Richard Allen, Elberling, Bo, Taş, Neslihan, Kneafsey, Timothy, Jansson, Janet K., and Øvreås, Lise. Tue . "Disentangling the complexity of permafrost soil by using high resolution profiling of microbial community composition, key functions and respiration rates: High resolution permafrost microbial profile". United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.14348.
@article{osti_1462122,
title = {Disentangling the complexity of permafrost soil by using high resolution profiling of microbial community composition, key functions and respiration rates: High resolution permafrost microbial profile},
author = {Müller, Oliver and Bang-Andreasen, Toke and White, Richard Allen and Elberling, Bo and Taş, Neslihan and Kneafsey, Timothy and Jansson, Janet K. and Øvreås, Lise},
abstractNote = {Thawing permafrost can stimulate microbial activity, leading to faster decomposition of formerly preserved organic matter and CO2 release. Detailed knowledge about the vertical distribution of the responsible microbial community that is changing with increasing soil depth is limited. In this study, we determined the microbial community composition from cores sampled in a high Arctic heath at Svalbard, Norway; spanning from the active layer (AL) into the permafrost layer (PL). A special aim has been on identifying a layer of recently thawed soil, the transition zone (TZ), which might provide new insights into the fate of thawing permafrost. A unique sampling strategy allowed us to observe a diverse and gradually shifting microbial community in the AL, a Bacteroidetes dominated community in the TZ and throughout the PL, a community strongly dominated by a single Actinobacteria family (Intrasporangiaceae). The contrasting abundances of these two taxa caused a community difference of about 60%, just within 3 cm from TZ to PL. We incubated subsamples at about 5°C and measured highest CO2 production rates under aerobic incubations, yet contrasting for five different layers and correlating to the microbial community composition. This high resolution strategy provides new insights on how microbial communities are structured in permafrost and a better understanding of how they respond to thaw.},
doi = {10.1111/1462-2920.14348},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology},
issn = {1462-2912},
number = 12,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/1462-2920.14348

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4 works
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Permafrost soil profile illustrating:

a)The soil structure in Adventdalen. Photograph shows the sedimentation process with periods of low sedimentation rates (small darker organic rich layers, marked with white triangles) and periods with higher sedimentation rates (thicker more pale layers).

b) Relative abundance of the 20 most abundant taxamore » at different taxonomical levels based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data showing the taxonomic prokaryotic community composition of the permafrost core profile. When taxonomical classes within a phylum showed very contrasting trends, the most abundant classes were illustrated instead of the entire phyla. Taxonomical levels are indicated by a one-letter code (p=phylum; c=class; f=family). Taxa comprising <1% of the total number of sequences within a sample were summarized as “Other”. Relative abundances for each sampling point are average values calculated from 2-6 replicates (Table S1).

c) Bray-Curtis dissimilarity values calculated for 16S rRNA gene sequence data at OTU level. Black triangles mark the transition from AL to TZ and from TZ to PL.

d) Alpha diversity indices (Chao1, Shannon and Simpson).<./p>

e) Bulk density measurement using X-ray CT scanning with measuring points for every centimeter (eleven example images illustrated on the left).

f) Soil chemistry (n=1) showing in blue the water content, in grey the carbon content and in red the pH throughout the core. Note that data was not available between 30 and 80 cm.

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Works referenced in this record:

Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB
journal, July 2006

  • DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.
  • Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 72, Issue 7, p. 5069-5072
  • DOI: 10.1128/AEM.03006-05

Search and clustering orders of magnitude faster than BLAST
journal, August 2010


    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.