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Title: A Roadmap for Nuclear Energy Technology

Abstract

The prospects for the future use of nuclear energy worldwide can best be understood within the context of global population growth, urbanization, rising energy need and associated pollution concerns. As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges are expected to be concentrated in cities of the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. As these countries continue their trajectory of economic development, their energy need will also outpace their population growth adding to the increased demand for electricity. OECD IEA’s energy system deployment pathway foresees doubling of the current global nuclear capacity by 2050 to reduce the impact of rapid urbanization. The pending “retirement cliff” of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet, representing over 60 percent of the nation’s emission-free electricity, also poses a large economic and environmental challenge. To meet the challenge, the U.S. DOE has developed the vision and strategy for development and deployment of advanced reactors. As part of that vision, the U.S. government pursues programs that aim to expand the use of nuclear power by supporting sustainability of the existing nuclear fleet, deploying new water-cooled large and small modular reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the energy security and climate change goals,more » conducting R&D for advanced reactor technologies with alternative coolants, and developing sustainable nuclear fuel cycle strategies. Since the current path relying heavily on water-cooled reactors and “once-through” fuel cycle is not sustainable, next generation nuclear energy systems under consideration aim for significant advances over existing and evolutionary water-cooled reactors. Among the spectrum of advanced reactor options, closed-fuel-cycle systems using reactors with fast-neutron spectrum to meet the sustainability goals offer the most attractive alternatives. However, unless the new public-private partnership models emerge to tackle the licensing and demonstration challenges for these advanced reactor concepts, realization of their enormous potential is not likely, at least in the U.S.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy - Office of Nuclear Reactor Technologies - Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART)
OSTI Identifier:
1460526
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1924; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Physics of Sustainable Energy Workshop; Related Information: Proceedings of the Physics of Sustainable Energy Workshop; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sofu, Tanju. A Roadmap for Nuclear Energy Technology. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5020284.
Sofu, Tanju. A Roadmap for Nuclear Energy Technology. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5020284.
Sofu, Tanju. Mon . "A Roadmap for Nuclear Energy Technology". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5020284.
@article{osti_1460526,
title = {A Roadmap for Nuclear Energy Technology},
author = {Sofu, Tanju},
abstractNote = {The prospects for the future use of nuclear energy worldwide can best be understood within the context of global population growth, urbanization, rising energy need and associated pollution concerns. As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges are expected to be concentrated in cities of the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. As these countries continue their trajectory of economic development, their energy need will also outpace their population growth adding to the increased demand for electricity. OECD IEA’s energy system deployment pathway foresees doubling of the current global nuclear capacity by 2050 to reduce the impact of rapid urbanization. The pending “retirement cliff” of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet, representing over 60 percent of the nation’s emission-free electricity, also poses a large economic and environmental challenge. To meet the challenge, the U.S. DOE has developed the vision and strategy for development and deployment of advanced reactors. As part of that vision, the U.S. government pursues programs that aim to expand the use of nuclear power by supporting sustainability of the existing nuclear fleet, deploying new water-cooled large and small modular reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the energy security and climate change goals, conducting R&D for advanced reactor technologies with alternative coolants, and developing sustainable nuclear fuel cycle strategies. Since the current path relying heavily on water-cooled reactors and “once-through” fuel cycle is not sustainable, next generation nuclear energy systems under consideration aim for significant advances over existing and evolutionary water-cooled reactors. Among the spectrum of advanced reactor options, closed-fuel-cycle systems using reactors with fast-neutron spectrum to meet the sustainability goals offer the most attractive alternatives. However, unless the new public-private partnership models emerge to tackle the licensing and demonstration challenges for these advanced reactor concepts, realization of their enormous potential is not likely, at least in the U.S.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5020284},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = 1,
volume = 1924,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}