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Title: I Would Like to Know...

Abstract

Problems of High-Energy Physics (NAL Design Report, January 1968) We would like to have answers to many questions. Among them are the following: Which, if any, of the particles that have so far been discovered, is, in fact, elementary, and is there any validity in the concept of “elementary” particles? What new particles can be made at energies that have not yet been reached? Is there some set of building blocks that is still more fundamental than the neutron and the proton? Is there a law that correctly predicts the existence and nature of all the particles, and if so, what is that law? Will the characteristics of some of the very short-lived particles appear to be different when they are produced at such higher velocities that they no longer spend their entire lives within the strong influence of the particle from which they are produced? Do new symmetries appear or old ones disappear for high momentum-transfer events? What is the connection, if any, of electromagnetism and strong interactions? Do the laws of electromagnetic radiation, which are now known to hold over an enormous range of lengths and frequencies, continue to hold in the wavelength domain characteristic of the subnuclearmore » particles? What is the connection between the weak interaction that is associated with the massless neutrino and the strong one that acts between neutron and proton? Is there some new particle underlying the action of the “weak” forces, just as, in the case of the nuclear force, there are mesons, and, in the case of the electromagnetic force, there are photons? If there is not, why not? In more technical terms: Is local field theory valid? A failure in locality may imply a failure in our concept of space. What are the fields relevant to a correct local field theory? What are the form factors of the particles? What exactly is the explanation of the electromagnetic mass difference? Do “weak” interactions become strong at sufficiently small distances? Is the Pomeranchuk theorem true? Do the total cross sections become constant at high energy? Will new symmetries appear, or old ones disappear, at higher energy?« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1460414
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-SLIDES-18-038-T
1682390
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Nikhef colloquium "I would like to know …", Amsterdam, Netherlands, April 20, 2018; Other Information: Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics, https://www.nikhef.nl/
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Quigg, Chris. I Would Like to Know.... United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Quigg, Chris. I Would Like to Know.... United States.
Quigg, Chris. Sun . "I Would Like to Know...". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1460414.
@article{osti_1460414,
title = {I Would Like to Know...},
author = {Quigg, Chris},
abstractNote = {Problems of High-Energy Physics (NAL Design Report, January 1968) We would like to have answers to many questions. Among them are the following: Which, if any, of the particles that have so far been discovered, is, in fact, elementary, and is there any validity in the concept of “elementary” particles? What new particles can be made at energies that have not yet been reached? Is there some set of building blocks that is still more fundamental than the neutron and the proton? Is there a law that correctly predicts the existence and nature of all the particles, and if so, what is that law? Will the characteristics of some of the very short-lived particles appear to be different when they are produced at such higher velocities that they no longer spend their entire lives within the strong influence of the particle from which they are produced? Do new symmetries appear or old ones disappear for high momentum-transfer events? What is the connection, if any, of electromagnetism and strong interactions? Do the laws of electromagnetic radiation, which are now known to hold over an enormous range of lengths and frequencies, continue to hold in the wavelength domain characteristic of the subnuclear particles? What is the connection between the weak interaction that is associated with the massless neutrino and the strong one that acts between neutron and proton? Is there some new particle underlying the action of the “weak” forces, just as, in the case of the nuclear force, there are mesons, and, in the case of the electromagnetic force, there are photons? If there is not, why not? In more technical terms: Is local field theory valid? A failure in locality may imply a failure in our concept of space. What are the fields relevant to a correct local field theory? What are the form factors of the particles? What exactly is the explanation of the electromagnetic mass difference? Do “weak” interactions become strong at sufficiently small distances? Is the Pomeranchuk theorem true? Do the total cross sections become constant at high energy? Will new symmetries appear, or old ones disappear, at higher energy?},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 11 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Sun Mar 11 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Conference:
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