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Title: Solar Hot Air Balloons for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres

Abstract

The first solar hot air balloon was constructed in the early 1970s (Besset, 2016). Over the following decades the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) developed the Montgolfiere Infrarouge (MIR) balloon, which flew on solar power during the day and infrared radiation from the Earth's surface at night (Fommerau and Rougeron, 2011). The balloons were capable of flying for over 60 days and apparently reached altitudes of 30 km at least once (Malaterre, 1993). Solar balloons were the subject of a Jet Propulsion Laboratory study that performed test flights on Earth (Jones and Wu 1999) and discussed their mission potential for Mars, Jupiter, and Venus (Jones and Heun, 1997). The solar balloons were deployed from the ground and dropped from hot air balloons; some were altitude controlled by means of a remotely-commanded air valve at the top of the envelope. More recently, solar balloons have been employed for infrasound studies in the lower stratosphere (see Table 1). The program began in 2015, when a prototype balloon reached an altitude of 22 kilometers before terminating just prior to float (Bowman et al., 2015). An infrasound sensor was successfully deployed on a solar balloon during the 2016 SISE/USIE experiment, in which an acousticmore » signal from a ground explosion was captured at a range of 330 km (Anderson et al. 2018; Young et al. 2018). This led to the launch of a 5-balloon infrasound network during the Heliotrope experiment (Bowman and Albert, 2018). The balloons were constructed by the researchers themselves at a materials of less than $50 per envelope.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1459770
Report Number(s):
SAND2018-7168R
665391
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Bowman, Daniel C., Albert, Sarah A., and Dexheimer, Darielle. Solar Hot Air Balloons for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1459770.
Bowman, Daniel C., Albert, Sarah A., & Dexheimer, Darielle. Solar Hot Air Balloons for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres. United States. doi:10.2172/1459770.
Bowman, Daniel C., Albert, Sarah A., and Dexheimer, Darielle. Sun . "Solar Hot Air Balloons for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres". United States. doi:10.2172/1459770. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1459770.
@article{osti_1459770,
title = {Solar Hot Air Balloons for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres},
author = {Bowman, Daniel C. and Albert, Sarah A. and Dexheimer, Darielle},
abstractNote = {The first solar hot air balloon was constructed in the early 1970s (Besset, 2016). Over the following decades the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) developed the Montgolfiere Infrarouge (MIR) balloon, which flew on solar power during the day and infrared radiation from the Earth's surface at night (Fommerau and Rougeron, 2011). The balloons were capable of flying for over 60 days and apparently reached altitudes of 30 km at least once (Malaterre, 1993). Solar balloons were the subject of a Jet Propulsion Laboratory study that performed test flights on Earth (Jones and Wu 1999) and discussed their mission potential for Mars, Jupiter, and Venus (Jones and Heun, 1997). The solar balloons were deployed from the ground and dropped from hot air balloons; some were altitude controlled by means of a remotely-commanded air valve at the top of the envelope. More recently, solar balloons have been employed for infrasound studies in the lower stratosphere (see Table 1). The program began in 2015, when a prototype balloon reached an altitude of 22 kilometers before terminating just prior to float (Bowman et al., 2015). An infrasound sensor was successfully deployed on a solar balloon during the 2016 SISE/USIE experiment, in which an acoustic signal from a ground explosion was captured at a range of 330 km (Anderson et al. 2018; Young et al. 2018). This led to the launch of a 5-balloon infrasound network during the Heliotrope experiment (Bowman and Albert, 2018). The balloons were constructed by the researchers themselves at a materials of less than $50 per envelope.},
doi = {10.2172/1459770},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}