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Title: Hybrid Multi-Material Endoskeleton Overmolded Structure for Automotive Powertrain

Abstract

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) worked with American Axle and Manufacturing (AAM) to demonstrate additive manufacturing’s (AM) applicability to multi-material endoskeleton driveline mechanisms. The goal of this phase one technical collaboration project was to significantly reduce mass, improve efficiency, and improve power torque density of the driveline mechanism through applied research analysis of a multi-material solution. The focus of the effort explored the impact of multi-material endoskeleton components on reducing the weight of a typical drivetrain component using a blend of metal additive manufacturing with overmolding. For this study, a conventional rear driveline power transfer unit housing was selected. The component was geometrically optimized for additive manufacturing and to ensure proper lubrication of the gears. Therefore, traditional weight reduction techniques were invalid because AM enables weight reduction far beyond what is capable with traditional manufacturing. The hypothesis was that an inner aluminum structure could be optimized with respect to strength and weight reduction. An outer composite surface was overmolded to the aluminum AM part to satisfy the part’s geometric constraints and to provide embodiment for oil encapsulation. The original component weighed 11.3 lb whereas the topologically optimized structure was 6.96 lbs, which is a 4.34 lbmore » difference. When the missing aluminum material was replaced with a composite material, the part weighed approximately 8.66 lbs resulting in a 2.64 lb or 23% weight reduction from the traditionally manufactured part. These first phase efforts are deemed a success. A proposed second phase will explore the material and design requirements necessary to ensure a viable mechanical interface between the AM component and overmolding.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1459289
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2018/828
CRADA/NFE-16-06318
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Peter, William H., Love, Lonnie J., Chesser, Phillip C., and Gaul, Katherine T.. Hybrid Multi-Material Endoskeleton Overmolded Structure for Automotive Powertrain. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1459289.
Peter, William H., Love, Lonnie J., Chesser, Phillip C., & Gaul, Katherine T.. Hybrid Multi-Material Endoskeleton Overmolded Structure for Automotive Powertrain. United States. doi:10.2172/1459289.
Peter, William H., Love, Lonnie J., Chesser, Phillip C., and Gaul, Katherine T.. Sun . "Hybrid Multi-Material Endoskeleton Overmolded Structure for Automotive Powertrain". United States. doi:10.2172/1459289. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1459289.
@article{osti_1459289,
title = {Hybrid Multi-Material Endoskeleton Overmolded Structure for Automotive Powertrain},
author = {Peter, William H. and Love, Lonnie J. and Chesser, Phillip C. and Gaul, Katherine T.},
abstractNote = {Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) worked with American Axle and Manufacturing (AAM) to demonstrate additive manufacturing’s (AM) applicability to multi-material endoskeleton driveline mechanisms. The goal of this phase one technical collaboration project was to significantly reduce mass, improve efficiency, and improve power torque density of the driveline mechanism through applied research analysis of a multi-material solution. The focus of the effort explored the impact of multi-material endoskeleton components on reducing the weight of a typical drivetrain component using a blend of metal additive manufacturing with overmolding. For this study, a conventional rear driveline power transfer unit housing was selected. The component was geometrically optimized for additive manufacturing and to ensure proper lubrication of the gears. Therefore, traditional weight reduction techniques were invalid because AM enables weight reduction far beyond what is capable with traditional manufacturing. The hypothesis was that an inner aluminum structure could be optimized with respect to strength and weight reduction. An outer composite surface was overmolded to the aluminum AM part to satisfy the part’s geometric constraints and to provide embodiment for oil encapsulation. The original component weighed 11.3 lb whereas the topologically optimized structure was 6.96 lbs, which is a 4.34 lb difference. When the missing aluminum material was replaced with a composite material, the part weighed approximately 8.66 lbs resulting in a 2.64 lb or 23% weight reduction from the traditionally manufactured part. These first phase efforts are deemed a success. A proposed second phase will explore the material and design requirements necessary to ensure a viable mechanical interface between the AM component and overmolding.},
doi = {10.2172/1459289},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Technical Report:

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