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Title: Understanding the Deformation Mechanisms of FeNiMnAlCr High Entropy Alloys

Abstract

The aim of this project was to understand the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn-Al-Cr high entropy alloys. High entropy alloys are defined as materials containing five or more elements with each element constituting 5-35 atomic percent of the alloy. We performed several different tasks in this project. 1) We showed that reducing the crystal or grain size in single-phase Fe40Ni11Mn35Al8Cr6 containing either 1.1 atomic percent carbon added or with no carbon added produced a substantial increase in strength with a small reduction in ductility. The finer grain size material was produced by cold rolling followed by heating to recrystallize the microstructure. The changes in strength and ductility were related to observed changes in deformation structure as determined by transmission electron microscopy. We also examined how the deformation behavior changed with temperature from -200°C to 200°C. 2) We showed that heating Fe36Ni18Mn33Al13 with and without 1.26 at.% carbon led to ordered body-centered cubic precipitates forming in the materials, which were both initially two-phase. The heat treatment again led to substantial increases in strength with some reduction in ductility. 3) We examined whether titanium additions (2 atomic percent) to Fe42Ni18Mn33Al13 could improve the mechanical properties. We examined both as-cast material andmore » material that had been recrystallized to produce a fine grain size. In both cases ordered body-centered cubic precipitates were present. Again, the recrystallization and resulting reduction in grain size increased the yield strength and reduced the ductility. We also showed, using high-resolution electron microscopy, that contrary to some predictions, having an alloy containing a range of atoms with different atomic diameters produced no lattice distortions. 4) We used scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to show that carbides formed during intermediate temperature (≤800oC) heating of carbon-doped Fe40Ni11Mn35Al8Cr6. In addition to forming within the grains, the carbides coated the grain boundaries. This produced an increase in strength but a drastic reduction in ductility. However, we showed by hot rolling we could get both high strength and high ductility for this material. The work led to nine publications in referred journals and contributed to the education of two Ph.D. students. In addition, ten presentations (six of which were invited) at conferences, at a university and at a national laboratory in Germany.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1458757
Report Number(s):
DOE-Dartmouth-46392-1
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-07ER46392
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Baker, Ian. Understanding the Deformation Mechanisms of FeNiMnAlCr High Entropy Alloys. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1458757.
Baker, Ian. Understanding the Deformation Mechanisms of FeNiMnAlCr High Entropy Alloys. United States. doi:10.2172/1458757.
Baker, Ian. Sat . "Understanding the Deformation Mechanisms of FeNiMnAlCr High Entropy Alloys". United States. doi:10.2172/1458757. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1458757.
@article{osti_1458757,
title = {Understanding the Deformation Mechanisms of FeNiMnAlCr High Entropy Alloys},
author = {Baker, Ian},
abstractNote = {The aim of this project was to understand the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn-Al-Cr high entropy alloys. High entropy alloys are defined as materials containing five or more elements with each element constituting 5-35 atomic percent of the alloy. We performed several different tasks in this project. 1) We showed that reducing the crystal or grain size in single-phase Fe40Ni11Mn35Al8Cr6 containing either 1.1 atomic percent carbon added or with no carbon added produced a substantial increase in strength with a small reduction in ductility. The finer grain size material was produced by cold rolling followed by heating to recrystallize the microstructure. The changes in strength and ductility were related to observed changes in deformation structure as determined by transmission electron microscopy. We also examined how the deformation behavior changed with temperature from -200°C to 200°C. 2) We showed that heating Fe36Ni18Mn33Al13 with and without 1.26 at.% carbon led to ordered body-centered cubic precipitates forming in the materials, which were both initially two-phase. The heat treatment again led to substantial increases in strength with some reduction in ductility. 3) We examined whether titanium additions (2 atomic percent) to Fe42Ni18Mn33Al13 could improve the mechanical properties. We examined both as-cast material and material that had been recrystallized to produce a fine grain size. In both cases ordered body-centered cubic precipitates were present. Again, the recrystallization and resulting reduction in grain size increased the yield strength and reduced the ductility. We also showed, using high-resolution electron microscopy, that contrary to some predictions, having an alloy containing a range of atoms with different atomic diameters produced no lattice distortions. 4) We used scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to show that carbides formed during intermediate temperature (≤800oC) heating of carbon-doped Fe40Ni11Mn35Al8Cr6. In addition to forming within the grains, the carbides coated the grain boundaries. This produced an increase in strength but a drastic reduction in ductility. However, we showed by hot rolling we could get both high strength and high ductility for this material. The work led to nine publications in referred journals and contributed to the education of two Ph.D. students. In addition, ten presentations (six of which were invited) at conferences, at a university and at a national laboratory in Germany.},
doi = {10.2172/1458757},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}