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Title: A Systems Biology and Pond Culture-based Understanding and Improvement of Metabolic Processes Related to Productivity in Diverse Microalgal Classes for Viable Biofuel Production

Abstract

The overarching goal of this project was to understand and manipulate fundamental molecular mechanisms involved in maximizing growth rate and lipid accumulation in diverse classes of microalgae under authentic diurnal conditions to enhance production capabilities for biofuels. The research was aimed at filling two critical knowledge gaps by addressing fundamental cellular issues that govern growth and fuel molecule accumulation in conjunction with realistic climate-simulated cultivation: 1) The insufficient understanding of the effect of metabolic topology on cellular carbon partitioning and its regulation with regards to productivity. 2) The understudied effect of the diurnal and cell cycles on cellular metabolism, resource allocation, and resource mobilization under simulated production conditions. To unravel broader as well as lineage-specific regulatory mechanisms that determine productivity, we compared green algae with diatoms. Complementing the systems approach with a pond-based cultivation method under authentic diurnal conditions, we anticipated an understanding of how the effect of diurnal and cell cycles affects growth and lipid productivity. Elucidation of the topology and regulation of relevant metabolic networks in proposed new model organisms was expected to enable improvements in functional capabilities and biosynthetic pathways. The major goals of the project were achieved by the following accomplishments. Genome assemblies and functional annotationsmore » for the green algae S. obliquus strain DOE0152Z and Coleastrella sp. strain DOE0202. Development of a metabolic map for the core carbon metabolism for S. obliquus. Analyzed the cellular topology for the core carbon network and proposed differences in core carbon metabolism for the Chlorophyceae versus the Trebouxiophyceae. Discovered the genes for enzymes involved in dicarboxylic acid metabolism and proposed the existence of C4-type metabolism for S. obliquus. Calculated the energy and reducing equivalencies for TAG and isoprenoid biosynthesis based on the core carbon network created in this project. Identified one newly created strain SOM-P004 (UV-Mutagenesis), which performed better at higher culture densities than wild type in LEAPS reactors under simulated environmental conditions. Results obtained within the course of this project were used in 2017 to apply for a Community Science Program (CSP) at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The project (JGI Proposal Id: 503423) with the Title “Comparative genomics and germ plasm diversity in Acutodesmus, a green microalgal bioenergy feedstock candidate with potential for breeding and hybridization.” was selected for CSP 2018 for sequencing of up to 30 genomes of the alga A. obliquus (=S. obliquus). Our genome of the strain DOE0152Z serves as a reference for this new CSP project. Characterization of synchronized cultures of Cyclotella cryptica and the implications on productivity. Determination that some cellular pigments respond to light, but others to the cell cycle. Characterization of productivity of C. cryptica in PNNL ponds. Genome sequence and metabolic mapping of Marinichlorella kaistiae KAS603. Demonstration that some green algae store and utilize starch in the cytoplasm. Photorespiratory pathway clarified in T. pseudonana leading to a better understanding of carbon flux pathways in diatoms. Genome sequence determination, annotation, and comparison completed for C. cryptica, identifying potential metabolic differences that lead to high biomass and lipid accumulation ability for this species. Transcriptomic comparison of silicon (Si) and nitrogen (N) limited triacylglycerol accumulation in Cyclotella cryptica.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1458513
Report Number(s):
DOE-SCRIPPS-12556
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012556
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hildebrand, Mark, Polle, Juergen, and Huesemann, Michael. A Systems Biology and Pond Culture-based Understanding and Improvement of Metabolic Processes Related to Productivity in Diverse Microalgal Classes for Viable Biofuel Production. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1458513.
Hildebrand, Mark, Polle, Juergen, & Huesemann, Michael. A Systems Biology and Pond Culture-based Understanding and Improvement of Metabolic Processes Related to Productivity in Diverse Microalgal Classes for Viable Biofuel Production. United States. doi:10.2172/1458513.
Hildebrand, Mark, Polle, Juergen, and Huesemann, Michael. Mon . "A Systems Biology and Pond Culture-based Understanding and Improvement of Metabolic Processes Related to Productivity in Diverse Microalgal Classes for Viable Biofuel Production". United States. doi:10.2172/1458513. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1458513.
@article{osti_1458513,
title = {A Systems Biology and Pond Culture-based Understanding and Improvement of Metabolic Processes Related to Productivity in Diverse Microalgal Classes for Viable Biofuel Production},
author = {Hildebrand, Mark and Polle, Juergen and Huesemann, Michael},
abstractNote = {The overarching goal of this project was to understand and manipulate fundamental molecular mechanisms involved in maximizing growth rate and lipid accumulation in diverse classes of microalgae under authentic diurnal conditions to enhance production capabilities for biofuels. The research was aimed at filling two critical knowledge gaps by addressing fundamental cellular issues that govern growth and fuel molecule accumulation in conjunction with realistic climate-simulated cultivation: 1) The insufficient understanding of the effect of metabolic topology on cellular carbon partitioning and its regulation with regards to productivity. 2) The understudied effect of the diurnal and cell cycles on cellular metabolism, resource allocation, and resource mobilization under simulated production conditions. To unravel broader as well as lineage-specific regulatory mechanisms that determine productivity, we compared green algae with diatoms. Complementing the systems approach with a pond-based cultivation method under authentic diurnal conditions, we anticipated an understanding of how the effect of diurnal and cell cycles affects growth and lipid productivity. Elucidation of the topology and regulation of relevant metabolic networks in proposed new model organisms was expected to enable improvements in functional capabilities and biosynthetic pathways. The major goals of the project were achieved by the following accomplishments. Genome assemblies and functional annotations for the green algae S. obliquus strain DOE0152Z and Coleastrella sp. strain DOE0202. Development of a metabolic map for the core carbon metabolism for S. obliquus. Analyzed the cellular topology for the core carbon network and proposed differences in core carbon metabolism for the Chlorophyceae versus the Trebouxiophyceae. Discovered the genes for enzymes involved in dicarboxylic acid metabolism and proposed the existence of C4-type metabolism for S. obliquus. Calculated the energy and reducing equivalencies for TAG and isoprenoid biosynthesis based on the core carbon network created in this project. Identified one newly created strain SOM-P004 (UV-Mutagenesis), which performed better at higher culture densities than wild type in LEAPS reactors under simulated environmental conditions. Results obtained within the course of this project were used in 2017 to apply for a Community Science Program (CSP) at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The project (JGI Proposal Id: 503423) with the Title “Comparative genomics and germ plasm diversity in Acutodesmus, a green microalgal bioenergy feedstock candidate with potential for breeding and hybridization.” was selected for CSP 2018 for sequencing of up to 30 genomes of the alga A. obliquus (=S. obliquus). Our genome of the strain DOE0152Z serves as a reference for this new CSP project. Characterization of synchronized cultures of Cyclotella cryptica and the implications on productivity. Determination that some cellular pigments respond to light, but others to the cell cycle. Characterization of productivity of C. cryptica in PNNL ponds. Genome sequence and metabolic mapping of Marinichlorella kaistiae KAS603. Demonstration that some green algae store and utilize starch in the cytoplasm. Photorespiratory pathway clarified in T. pseudonana leading to a better understanding of carbon flux pathways in diatoms. Genome sequence determination, annotation, and comparison completed for C. cryptica, identifying potential metabolic differences that lead to high biomass and lipid accumulation ability for this species. Transcriptomic comparison of silicon (Si) and nitrogen (N) limited triacylglycerol accumulation in Cyclotella cryptica.},
doi = {10.2172/1458513},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}