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Title: High-Efficiency Solid State Heat Pump Module

Abstract

The baseline heat pumping technology today is dominated by vapor compression refrigeration cycle that involves use of global warming potential fluids (e.g. hydrofluorocarbons HFC). Current regulations (e.g. 2016 Kigali agreement) and market needs are driving HVAC&R related building, automotive and aerospace industries to safe, compact and cost-effective systems with low global warming potential (GWP) footprint (i.e. direct GWP impact) and higher efficiencies (i.e. indirect GWP impact) and low life cycle cost. Among the solid-state technology options, electrocaloric heat pumping (ECHP) technology has potential to be more efficient, quiet and compact than vapor compression systems. However, electrocaloric technology is still at low maturity, as expressed by standard technology readiness level (TRL) assessments and hence was the focus of the current effort. During the current research effort, UTRC proved feasibility (TRL2/3) of the direct-air ECHP concept by demonstrating cooling of ambient air by 8.4°C (under no load conditions) in a laboratory environment. To the team’s knowledge this is the largest direct air cooling demonstration using electrocaloric technology. The technology was matured from lab-scale dime-sized materials to module-scale dimensions and further demonstrated the feasibility of integrating these electrocaloric materials into modules for providing direct-air cooling. The use of inexpensive polymer-based materials validates themore » economic feasibility of the proposed technology. Future effort is required to further mature this promising technology to TRL 4/5 demonstrating module and system performance at full capacity and efficiency. Maturity to beyond TRL4/5 could be done with limited potential field trials. Successful field trials can pave the way for commercialization. At full commercialization, electrocaloric based heating and cooling technologies have the potential to enable annual energy savings upwards of a quadrillion BTUs and reduction of 10s of million metric tons/yr of Green-House Gas (GHG) emissions in the US, leapfrogging emerging technologies and disrupting traditional cooling and heating systems in residential and commercial HVAC applications and enabling new applications. This would result in reduction of energy imports, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and help create US jobs in this new technical area.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), Hartford, CT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), Hartford, CT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1456857
Report Number(s):
DOE-UTRC-EE0007044
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0007044
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; electrocaloric; heat pump; non-vapor compression

Citation Formats

Annapragada, S. Ravi, Verma, Parmesh, Sur, Aritra, and Xie, Wei. High-Efficiency Solid State Heat Pump Module. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1456857.
Annapragada, S. Ravi, Verma, Parmesh, Sur, Aritra, & Xie, Wei. High-Efficiency Solid State Heat Pump Module. United States. doi:10.2172/1456857.
Annapragada, S. Ravi, Verma, Parmesh, Sur, Aritra, and Xie, Wei. Fri . "High-Efficiency Solid State Heat Pump Module". United States. doi:10.2172/1456857. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1456857.
@article{osti_1456857,
title = {High-Efficiency Solid State Heat Pump Module},
author = {Annapragada, S. Ravi and Verma, Parmesh and Sur, Aritra and Xie, Wei},
abstractNote = {The baseline heat pumping technology today is dominated by vapor compression refrigeration cycle that involves use of global warming potential fluids (e.g. hydrofluorocarbons HFC). Current regulations (e.g. 2016 Kigali agreement) and market needs are driving HVAC&R related building, automotive and aerospace industries to safe, compact and cost-effective systems with low global warming potential (GWP) footprint (i.e. direct GWP impact) and higher efficiencies (i.e. indirect GWP impact) and low life cycle cost. Among the solid-state technology options, electrocaloric heat pumping (ECHP) technology has potential to be more efficient, quiet and compact than vapor compression systems. However, electrocaloric technology is still at low maturity, as expressed by standard technology readiness level (TRL) assessments and hence was the focus of the current effort. During the current research effort, UTRC proved feasibility (TRL2/3) of the direct-air ECHP concept by demonstrating cooling of ambient air by 8.4°C (under no load conditions) in a laboratory environment. To the team’s knowledge this is the largest direct air cooling demonstration using electrocaloric technology. The technology was matured from lab-scale dime-sized materials to module-scale dimensions and further demonstrated the feasibility of integrating these electrocaloric materials into modules for providing direct-air cooling. The use of inexpensive polymer-based materials validates the economic feasibility of the proposed technology. Future effort is required to further mature this promising technology to TRL 4/5 demonstrating module and system performance at full capacity and efficiency. Maturity to beyond TRL4/5 could be done with limited potential field trials. Successful field trials can pave the way for commercialization. At full commercialization, electrocaloric based heating and cooling technologies have the potential to enable annual energy savings upwards of a quadrillion BTUs and reduction of 10s of million metric tons/yr of Green-House Gas (GHG) emissions in the US, leapfrogging emerging technologies and disrupting traditional cooling and heating systems in residential and commercial HVAC applications and enabling new applications. This would result in reduction of energy imports, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and help create US jobs in this new technical area.},
doi = {10.2172/1456857},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}