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Title: “Ni-Less” Cathodes for High Energy Density, Intermediate Temperature Na-NiCl 2 Batteries

Abstract

Among various battery technologies being considered for stationary energy storage applications, sodium-metal halide (Na-MH) batteries have become one of the most attractive candidates because of the abundance of raw materials, long cycle life, high energy density, and superior safety. However, one of issues limiting its practical application is the relatively expensive nickel (Ni) used in the cathode. In the present work, we focus on of efforts to develop new Ni-based cathodes, and demonstrate that a much higher specific energy density of 405 Wh/kg (23% higher than state-of-the-art Na-MH batteries) can be achieved at an operating temperature of 190oC. Furthermore, 15% less Ni is used in the new cathode than that in conventional Na-NiCl2 batteries. Long-term cycling tests also show stable electrochemical performance for over 300 cycles with excellent capacity retention (~100%). The results in this work indicate that these advances can significantly reduce the raw material cost associated with Ni (a 31% reduction) and promote practical applications of Na-MH battery technologies in stationary energy storage systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Electrochemical Materials and Systems Group, Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA
  2. Materials Research Division, Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 South Korea
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1455259
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-130933
Journal ID: ISSN 2196-7350; TE1400000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advanced Materials Interfaces; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chang, Hee-Jung, Lu, Xiaochuan, Bonnett, Jeffery F., Canfield, Nathan L., Son, Sori, Park, Yoon-Cheol, Jung, Keeyoung, Sprenkle, Vincent L., and Li, Guosheng. “Ni-Less” Cathodes for High Energy Density, Intermediate Temperature Na-NiCl2 Batteries. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/admi.201701592.
Chang, Hee-Jung, Lu, Xiaochuan, Bonnett, Jeffery F., Canfield, Nathan L., Son, Sori, Park, Yoon-Cheol, Jung, Keeyoung, Sprenkle, Vincent L., & Li, Guosheng. “Ni-Less” Cathodes for High Energy Density, Intermediate Temperature Na-NiCl2 Batteries. United States. doi:10.1002/admi.201701592.
Chang, Hee-Jung, Lu, Xiaochuan, Bonnett, Jeffery F., Canfield, Nathan L., Son, Sori, Park, Yoon-Cheol, Jung, Keeyoung, Sprenkle, Vincent L., and Li, Guosheng. Thu . "“Ni-Less” Cathodes for High Energy Density, Intermediate Temperature Na-NiCl2 Batteries". United States. doi:10.1002/admi.201701592.
@article{osti_1455259,
title = {“Ni-Less” Cathodes for High Energy Density, Intermediate Temperature Na-NiCl2 Batteries},
author = {Chang, Hee-Jung and Lu, Xiaochuan and Bonnett, Jeffery F. and Canfield, Nathan L. and Son, Sori and Park, Yoon-Cheol and Jung, Keeyoung and Sprenkle, Vincent L. and Li, Guosheng},
abstractNote = {Among various battery technologies being considered for stationary energy storage applications, sodium-metal halide (Na-MH) batteries have become one of the most attractive candidates because of the abundance of raw materials, long cycle life, high energy density, and superior safety. However, one of issues limiting its practical application is the relatively expensive nickel (Ni) used in the cathode. In the present work, we focus on of efforts to develop new Ni-based cathodes, and demonstrate that a much higher specific energy density of 405 Wh/kg (23% higher than state-of-the-art Na-MH batteries) can be achieved at an operating temperature of 190oC. Furthermore, 15% less Ni is used in the new cathode than that in conventional Na-NiCl2 batteries. Long-term cycling tests also show stable electrochemical performance for over 300 cycles with excellent capacity retention (~100%). The results in this work indicate that these advances can significantly reduce the raw material cost associated with Ni (a 31% reduction) and promote practical applications of Na-MH battery technologies in stationary energy storage systems.},
doi = {10.1002/admi.201701592},
journal = {Advanced Materials Interfaces},
number = 10,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}