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Title: Policy and Technical Issues Facing a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty. Chapter 14

Abstract

We report the largest obstacle to creating nuclear weapons, starting with the ones that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki, has been to make sufficient quantities of fissile materials – highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium – to sustain an explosive fission chain reaction.1 Recognition of this fact has, for more than fifty years, underpinned both the support for and the opposition to adoption of an international treaty banning at a minimum the production of more fissile materials for nuclear weapons, commonly referred to as a fissile material cutoff treaty (FMCT).

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE NA Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development (NA-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1454771
DOE Contract Number:  
NA0002534
Resource Type:
Other
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Chapter 14 in Routledge Handbook of Nuclear Proliferation and Policy, ed. by Joseph F. Pilat and Nathan E. Busch.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION

Citation Formats

von Hippel, Frank, and Mian, Zia. Policy and Technical Issues Facing a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty. Chapter 14. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.4324/9780203709528.
von Hippel, Frank, & Mian, Zia. Policy and Technical Issues Facing a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty. Chapter 14. United States. doi:10.4324/9780203709528.
von Hippel, Frank, and Mian, Zia. Mon . "Policy and Technical Issues Facing a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty. Chapter 14". United States. doi:10.4324/9780203709528. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1454771.
@article{osti_1454771,
title = {Policy and Technical Issues Facing a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty. Chapter 14},
author = {von Hippel, Frank and Mian, Zia},
abstractNote = {We report the largest obstacle to creating nuclear weapons, starting with the ones that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki, has been to make sufficient quantities of fissile materials – highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium – to sustain an explosive fission chain reaction.1 Recognition of this fact has, for more than fifty years, underpinned both the support for and the opposition to adoption of an international treaty banning at a minimum the production of more fissile materials for nuclear weapons, commonly referred to as a fissile material cutoff treaty (FMCT).},
doi = {10.4324/9780203709528},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}