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Title: Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections

Abstract

Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared to each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross section library.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
14542
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-134747; AT5015032
AT5015032; TRN: US0106158
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 5th International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT-5), Rome (IT), 09/19/1999--09/24/1999; Other Information: PBD: 18 Jun 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CROSS SECTIONS; EVALUATION; FIRST WALL; MODIFICATIONS; NEUTRON SPECTRA; NEUTRON TRANSPORT; PHOTON TRANSPORT; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; T CODES; NUCLEAR DATA COLLECTIONS; HYLIFE CONVERTER

Citation Formats

Cullen, D, Latkowski, J, and Sanz, J. Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Cullen, D, Latkowski, J, & Sanz, J. Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections. United States.
Cullen, D, Latkowski, J, and Sanz, J. 1999. "Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/14542.
@article{osti_14542,
title = {Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections},
author = {Cullen, D and Latkowski, J and Sanz, J},
abstractNote = {Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared to each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross section library.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 6
}

Conference:
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