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Title: Riverbed Hydrologic Exchange Dynamics in a Large Regulated River Reach

Abstract

Hydrologic exchange flux (HEF) is an important hydrologic component in river corridors that includes both bidirectional (hyporheic) and unidirectional (gaining/losing) surface water – groundwater exchanges. Quantifying HEF rates in a large regulated river is difficult due to the large spatial domains, complexity of geomorphologic features and subsurface properties, and the great stage variations created by dam operations at multiple time scales. In this study, we developed a method that combined numerical modeling and field measurements for estimating HEF rates across the river bed in a 7‐km long reach of the highly regulated Columbia River. A high‐resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling framework was developed and validated by field measurements and other modeling results to characterize the HEF dynamics across the river bed. We found that about 85% of the time from 2008‐2014 the river was losing water with an annual average net HEF rates across the river bed (Qz) of ‐2.3 m3 s−1 (negative indicating downwelling). June was the only month that the river gained water, with monthly averaged Qz of 0.8 m3 s−1. We also found that the daily dam operations increased the hourly gross gaining and losing rate over an average year of 8% and 2%, respectively. Bymore » investigating the HEF feedbacks at various time scales, we suggest that the dam operations could reduce the HEF at seasonal time scale by decreasing the seasonal flow variations, while also enhance the HEF at sub‐daily time scale by generating high frequency discharge variations. These changes could generate significant impacts on biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA
  2. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New Mexico USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1452869
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123666
Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397; KP1702030
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Water Resources Research; Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhou, Tian, Bao, Jie, Huang, Maoyi, Hou, Zhangshuan, Arntzen, Evan, Song, Xuehang, Harding, Samuel F., Titzler, P. Scott, Ren, Huiying, Murray, Christopher J., Perkins, William A., Chen, Xingyuan, Stegen, James C., Hammond, Glenn E., Thorne, Paul D., and Zachara, John M. Riverbed Hydrologic Exchange Dynamics in a Large Regulated River Reach. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/2017WR020508.
Zhou, Tian, Bao, Jie, Huang, Maoyi, Hou, Zhangshuan, Arntzen, Evan, Song, Xuehang, Harding, Samuel F., Titzler, P. Scott, Ren, Huiying, Murray, Christopher J., Perkins, William A., Chen, Xingyuan, Stegen, James C., Hammond, Glenn E., Thorne, Paul D., & Zachara, John M. Riverbed Hydrologic Exchange Dynamics in a Large Regulated River Reach. United States. doi:10.1002/2017WR020508.
Zhou, Tian, Bao, Jie, Huang, Maoyi, Hou, Zhangshuan, Arntzen, Evan, Song, Xuehang, Harding, Samuel F., Titzler, P. Scott, Ren, Huiying, Murray, Christopher J., Perkins, William A., Chen, Xingyuan, Stegen, James C., Hammond, Glenn E., Thorne, Paul D., and Zachara, John M. Sun . "Riverbed Hydrologic Exchange Dynamics in a Large Regulated River Reach". United States. doi:10.1002/2017WR020508.
@article{osti_1452869,
title = {Riverbed Hydrologic Exchange Dynamics in a Large Regulated River Reach},
author = {Zhou, Tian and Bao, Jie and Huang, Maoyi and Hou, Zhangshuan and Arntzen, Evan and Song, Xuehang and Harding, Samuel F. and Titzler, P. Scott and Ren, Huiying and Murray, Christopher J. and Perkins, William A. and Chen, Xingyuan and Stegen, James C. and Hammond, Glenn E. and Thorne, Paul D. and Zachara, John M.},
abstractNote = {Hydrologic exchange flux (HEF) is an important hydrologic component in river corridors that includes both bidirectional (hyporheic) and unidirectional (gaining/losing) surface water – groundwater exchanges. Quantifying HEF rates in a large regulated river is difficult due to the large spatial domains, complexity of geomorphologic features and subsurface properties, and the great stage variations created by dam operations at multiple time scales. In this study, we developed a method that combined numerical modeling and field measurements for estimating HEF rates across the river bed in a 7‐km long reach of the highly regulated Columbia River. A high‐resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling framework was developed and validated by field measurements and other modeling results to characterize the HEF dynamics across the river bed. We found that about 85% of the time from 2008‐2014 the river was losing water with an annual average net HEF rates across the river bed (Qz) of ‐2.3 m3 s−1 (negative indicating downwelling). June was the only month that the river gained water, with monthly averaged Qz of 0.8 m3 s−1. We also found that the daily dam operations increased the hourly gross gaining and losing rate over an average year of 8% and 2%, respectively. By investigating the HEF feedbacks at various time scales, we suggest that the dam operations could reduce the HEF at seasonal time scale by decreasing the seasonal flow variations, while also enhance the HEF at sub‐daily time scale by generating high frequency discharge variations. These changes could generate significant impacts on biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone.},
doi = {10.1002/2017WR020508},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = 4,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}