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Title: Laser dye technology

Abstract

The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
14418
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-135785
TRN: US0111036
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; DYE LASERS; DYES; LASER ISOTOPE SEPARATION; UNDERWATER OPERATIONS; COMMUNICATIONS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Hammond, P R. Laser dye technology. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/14418.
Hammond, P R. Laser dye technology. United States. doi:10.2172/14418.
Hammond, P R. Wed . "Laser dye technology". United States. doi:10.2172/14418. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/14418.
@article{osti_14418,
title = {Laser dye technology},
author = {Hammond, P R},
abstractNote = {The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.},
doi = {10.2172/14418},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}

Technical Report:

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