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Title: Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints

Abstract

The overall goals of this research are: (1) to determine the physical fate of single and multiple methane bubbles emitted to the water column by dissociating gas hydrates at seep sites deep within the hydrate stability zone or at the updip limit of gas hydrate stability, and (2) to quantitatively link theoretical and laboratory findings on methane transport to the analysis of real-world field-scale methane plume data placed within the context of the degrading methane hydrate province on the US Atlantic margin. The project is arranged to advance on three interrelated fronts (numerical modeling, laboratory experiments, and analysis of field-based plume data) simultaneously. The fundamental objectives of each component are the following: Numerical modeling: Constraining the conditions under which rising bubbles become armored with hydrate, the impact of hydrate armoring on the eventual fate of a bubble’s methane, and the role of multiple bubble interactions in survival of methane plumes to very shallow depths in the water column. Laboratory experiments: Exploring the parameter space (e.g., bubble size, gas saturation in the liquid phase, “proximity” to the stability boundary) for formation of a hydrate shell around a free bubble in water, the rise rate of such bubbles, and the bubble’s acousticmore » characteristics using field-scale frequencies. Field component: Extending the results of numerical modeling and laboratory experiments to the field-scale using brand new, existing, public-domain, state-of-the-art real world data on US Atlantic margin methane seeps, without acquiring new field data in the course of this particular project. This component quantitatively analyzes data on Atlantic margin methane plumes and place those new plumes and their corresponding seeps within the context of gas hydrate degradation processes on this margin.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1439826
Report Number(s):
DOE-MIT-0013999
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0013999
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; Methane Hydrates

Citation Formats

Juanes, Ruben. Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1439826.
Juanes, Ruben. Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints. United States. doi:10.2172/1439826.
Juanes, Ruben. Fri . "Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints". United States. doi:10.2172/1439826. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1439826.
@article{osti_1439826,
title = {Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints},
author = {Juanes, Ruben},
abstractNote = {The overall goals of this research are: (1) to determine the physical fate of single and multiple methane bubbles emitted to the water column by dissociating gas hydrates at seep sites deep within the hydrate stability zone or at the updip limit of gas hydrate stability, and (2) to quantitatively link theoretical and laboratory findings on methane transport to the analysis of real-world field-scale methane plume data placed within the context of the degrading methane hydrate province on the US Atlantic margin. The project is arranged to advance on three interrelated fronts (numerical modeling, laboratory experiments, and analysis of field-based plume data) simultaneously. The fundamental objectives of each component are the following: Numerical modeling: Constraining the conditions under which rising bubbles become armored with hydrate, the impact of hydrate armoring on the eventual fate of a bubble’s methane, and the role of multiple bubble interactions in survival of methane plumes to very shallow depths in the water column. Laboratory experiments: Exploring the parameter space (e.g., bubble size, gas saturation in the liquid phase, “proximity” to the stability boundary) for formation of a hydrate shell around a free bubble in water, the rise rate of such bubbles, and the bubble’s acoustic characteristics using field-scale frequencies. Field component: Extending the results of numerical modeling and laboratory experiments to the field-scale using brand new, existing, public-domain, state-of-the-art real world data on US Atlantic margin methane seeps, without acquiring new field data in the course of this particular project. This component quantitatively analyzes data on Atlantic margin methane plumes and place those new plumes and their corresponding seeps within the context of gas hydrate degradation processes on this margin.},
doi = {10.2172/1439826},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Technical Report:

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