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Title: Meeting report: a hard look at the state of enamel research

Abstract

Enamel is a principal component of the dentition, and defects in this hard tissue are associated with a wide variety of diseases. To assess the state of the field of enamel research, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) convened the “Encouraging Novel Amelogenesis Models and Ex vivo cell Lines (ENAMEL) Development” workshop at its Bethesda headquarters on 23 June 2017. Enamel formation involves complex developmental stages and cellular differentiation mechanisms that are summarized in Figure 1. The meeting, which was organized by Jason Wan from NIDCR, had three sessions: model organisms, stem cells/cell lines, and tissues/ 3D cell culture/organoids. In attendance were investigators interested in enamel from a broad range of disciplines as well as NIDCR leadership and staff. The meeting brought together developmental biologists, cell biologists, human geneticists, materials scientists, and clinical researchers from across the United States to discuss recent progress and future challenges in our understanding of the formation and function of enamel. Lively discussions took place throughout the day, and this meeting report highlights some of the major findings and ideas that emerged during the workshop.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1439701
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-130908
Journal ID: ISSN 1674-2818; 453040220
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Oral Science; Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
enamel; mineralized tissue; mineralization; ameloblast; stem Cell

Citation Formats

Klein, Ophir D., Duverger, Olivier, Shaw, Wendy, Lacruz, Rodrigo S., Joester, Derk, Moradian-Oldak, Janet, Pugach, Megan K., Wright, J. Timothy, Millar, Sarah E., Kulkarni, Ashok B., Bartlett, John D., Diekwisch, Thomas GH, DenBesten, Pamela, and Simmer, James P. Meeting report: a hard look at the state of enamel research. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ijos.2017.40.
Klein, Ophir D., Duverger, Olivier, Shaw, Wendy, Lacruz, Rodrigo S., Joester, Derk, Moradian-Oldak, Janet, Pugach, Megan K., Wright, J. Timothy, Millar, Sarah E., Kulkarni, Ashok B., Bartlett, John D., Diekwisch, Thomas GH, DenBesten, Pamela, & Simmer, James P. Meeting report: a hard look at the state of enamel research. United States. doi:10.1038/ijos.2017.40.
Klein, Ophir D., Duverger, Olivier, Shaw, Wendy, Lacruz, Rodrigo S., Joester, Derk, Moradian-Oldak, Janet, Pugach, Megan K., Wright, J. Timothy, Millar, Sarah E., Kulkarni, Ashok B., Bartlett, John D., Diekwisch, Thomas GH, DenBesten, Pamela, and Simmer, James P. Wed . "Meeting report: a hard look at the state of enamel research". United States. doi:10.1038/ijos.2017.40.
@article{osti_1439701,
title = {Meeting report: a hard look at the state of enamel research},
author = {Klein, Ophir D. and Duverger, Olivier and Shaw, Wendy and Lacruz, Rodrigo S. and Joester, Derk and Moradian-Oldak, Janet and Pugach, Megan K. and Wright, J. Timothy and Millar, Sarah E. and Kulkarni, Ashok B. and Bartlett, John D. and Diekwisch, Thomas GH and DenBesten, Pamela and Simmer, James P.},
abstractNote = {Enamel is a principal component of the dentition, and defects in this hard tissue are associated with a wide variety of diseases. To assess the state of the field of enamel research, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) convened the “Encouraging Novel Amelogenesis Models and Ex vivo cell Lines (ENAMEL) Development” workshop at its Bethesda headquarters on 23 June 2017. Enamel formation involves complex developmental stages and cellular differentiation mechanisms that are summarized in Figure 1. The meeting, which was organized by Jason Wan from NIDCR, had three sessions: model organisms, stem cells/cell lines, and tissues/ 3D cell culture/organoids. In attendance were investigators interested in enamel from a broad range of disciplines as well as NIDCR leadership and staff. The meeting brought together developmental biologists, cell biologists, human geneticists, materials scientists, and clinical researchers from across the United States to discuss recent progress and future challenges in our understanding of the formation and function of enamel. Lively discussions took place throughout the day, and this meeting report highlights some of the major findings and ideas that emerged during the workshop.},
doi = {10.1038/ijos.2017.40},
journal = {International Journal of Oral Science},
number = 11,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 22 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Nov 22 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}