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Title: Characterization of Lignin Streams during Bionic Liquid-Based Pretreatment from Grass, Hardwood, and Softwood

Abstract

Delignification as a function of ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment has potential in terms of recovering and converting the fractionated lignin streams to renewable products. Renewable biogenic ionic liquids, or bionic liquids (eg. cholinium lysinate, ([Ch][Lys])), provide opportunities in terms of effective, economic and sustainable lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. We have evaluated [Ch][Lys] pretreatment in terms of sugar and lignin yields for three different feedstocks: switchgrass, eucalyptus, and pine. Four lignin streams isolated during [Ch][Lys] pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis were comprehensively analyzed, tracking their changes in physical-chemical structures. We observed changes in major lignin linkages and lignin aromatics units (p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringil (S)) that occurred during pretreatment. A compositional analysis of the different process streams and a comprehensive mass balance in conjunction with multiple analytical techniques (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Mass Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC)) is presented. Qualitative and quantitative analyses indicates that there are significantly more lignin-carbohydrate interactions for G-rich lignin in pine. The lignin removal and extent of lignin depolymerization for switchgrass and eucalyptus were higher than pine, and follows the order of switchgrass > eucalyptus > pine. The recovered lignin from pretreated liquid contained a lower relative amount of carbohydratemore » signals than raw biomass, indicating a high degree of dissociation of lignin carbohydrate complex (LCC) linkages for all samples analyzed. The insights gained from this work contribute to better understanding of physiochemical properties of lignin streams generated during [Ch][Lys] pretreatment, offering a starting point for lignin valorization strategies.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1];  [4]; ORCiD logo [4];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Joint BioEnergy Institute, 5885 Hollis Street, Emeryville, California 94608, United States; Biological and Engineering Science Center, Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551, United States
  2. Joint BioEnergy Institute, 5885 Hollis Street, Emeryville, California 94608, United States; Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, United States
  3. Joint BioEnergy Institute, 5885 Hollis Street, Emeryville, California 94608, United States
  4. Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1439657
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-131395
Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0485; 48827; 49827; 47965; KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
lignin; ionic liquids; NMR; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Dutta, Tanmoy, Papa, Gabriella, Wang, Eileen, Sun, Jian, Isern, Nancy G., Cort, John R., Simmons, Blake A., and Singh, Seema. Characterization of Lignin Streams during Bionic Liquid-Based Pretreatment from Grass, Hardwood, and Softwood. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b02991.
Dutta, Tanmoy, Papa, Gabriella, Wang, Eileen, Sun, Jian, Isern, Nancy G., Cort, John R., Simmons, Blake A., & Singh, Seema. Characterization of Lignin Streams during Bionic Liquid-Based Pretreatment from Grass, Hardwood, and Softwood. United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b02991.
Dutta, Tanmoy, Papa, Gabriella, Wang, Eileen, Sun, Jian, Isern, Nancy G., Cort, John R., Simmons, Blake A., and Singh, Seema. Fri . "Characterization of Lignin Streams during Bionic Liquid-Based Pretreatment from Grass, Hardwood, and Softwood". United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b02991.
@article{osti_1439657,
title = {Characterization of Lignin Streams during Bionic Liquid-Based Pretreatment from Grass, Hardwood, and Softwood},
author = {Dutta, Tanmoy and Papa, Gabriella and Wang, Eileen and Sun, Jian and Isern, Nancy G. and Cort, John R. and Simmons, Blake A. and Singh, Seema},
abstractNote = {Delignification as a function of ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment has potential in terms of recovering and converting the fractionated lignin streams to renewable products. Renewable biogenic ionic liquids, or bionic liquids (eg. cholinium lysinate, ([Ch][Lys])), provide opportunities in terms of effective, economic and sustainable lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. We have evaluated [Ch][Lys] pretreatment in terms of sugar and lignin yields for three different feedstocks: switchgrass, eucalyptus, and pine. Four lignin streams isolated during [Ch][Lys] pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis were comprehensively analyzed, tracking their changes in physical-chemical structures. We observed changes in major lignin linkages and lignin aromatics units (p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringil (S)) that occurred during pretreatment. A compositional analysis of the different process streams and a comprehensive mass balance in conjunction with multiple analytical techniques (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Mass Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC)) is presented. Qualitative and quantitative analyses indicates that there are significantly more lignin-carbohydrate interactions for G-rich lignin in pine. The lignin removal and extent of lignin depolymerization for switchgrass and eucalyptus were higher than pine, and follows the order of switchgrass > eucalyptus > pine. The recovered lignin from pretreated liquid contained a lower relative amount of carbohydrate signals than raw biomass, indicating a high degree of dissociation of lignin carbohydrate complex (LCC) linkages for all samples analyzed. The insights gained from this work contribute to better understanding of physiochemical properties of lignin streams generated during [Ch][Lys] pretreatment, offering a starting point for lignin valorization strategies.},
doi = {10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b02991},
journal = {ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering},
number = 3,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}