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Title: The dynamic life of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbionts

Abstract

One of the most fascinating biological interactions lies just beneath our feet. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota, form a text-book example of symbiosis with more than 80% of plant species. Yet, few people have the opportunity to observe AMF directly. Most AMF living within a root have three distinct body structures that can be observed under a microscope: hyphae, arbuscules, and vesicles. Hyphae are thin, wispy projections that reach out from the root and absorb nutrients like phosphorous from the soil (Fig. 1a, c). Hyphae transport nutrients back to the roots through arbuscules that extend into the root cells. Arbuscules are highly branched networks that exchange the nutrients from the soil for carbohydrates produced by the host plant during photosynthesis. AMF are also able to store lipids in vesicles, which are small, round structures within the root cells (Fig. 1b, d). AMF produce the lipids stored in vesicles from plant-derived carbon and use them for energy when the plant is not actively photosynthesizing. The host plant cannot access lipids within vesicles, so their production represents a complete transfer of carbon from plant host to fungus. Most roots do not contain all AMF structures. Even on plantsmore » colonized by AMF, not all roots show signs of colonization. On some roots, a multitude of fungal structures are evident within the roots. On others, those structures are nowhere to be found.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Department, Iowa State University, 251 Bessey Hall, 2200 Osborne Drive Ames Iowa 50011 USA
  2. Department of Biology, Indiana University, Jordan Hall 142, 1001 East 3rd Street Bloomington Indiana 47405 USA
  3. Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Department, Iowa State University, 251 Bessey Hall, 2200 Osborne Drive Ames Iowa 50011 USA; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3335 Innovation Boulevard Richland Washington 99354 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1439648
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129609
Journal ID: ISSN 0012-9658; 49698; KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0012-9658
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America (ESA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Bach, Elizabeth M., Narvaez-Rivera, Giselle, Murray, Kira, Bauer, Jonathan T., and Hofmockel, Kirsten S. The dynamic life of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbionts. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/ecy.2096.
Bach, Elizabeth M., Narvaez-Rivera, Giselle, Murray, Kira, Bauer, Jonathan T., & Hofmockel, Kirsten S. The dynamic life of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbionts. United States. doi:10.1002/ecy.2096.
Bach, Elizabeth M., Narvaez-Rivera, Giselle, Murray, Kira, Bauer, Jonathan T., and Hofmockel, Kirsten S. Wed . "The dynamic life of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbionts". United States. doi:10.1002/ecy.2096.
@article{osti_1439648,
title = {The dynamic life of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbionts},
author = {Bach, Elizabeth M. and Narvaez-Rivera, Giselle and Murray, Kira and Bauer, Jonathan T. and Hofmockel, Kirsten S.},
abstractNote = {One of the most fascinating biological interactions lies just beneath our feet. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota, form a text-book example of symbiosis with more than 80% of plant species. Yet, few people have the opportunity to observe AMF directly. Most AMF living within a root have three distinct body structures that can be observed under a microscope: hyphae, arbuscules, and vesicles. Hyphae are thin, wispy projections that reach out from the root and absorb nutrients like phosphorous from the soil (Fig. 1a, c). Hyphae transport nutrients back to the roots through arbuscules that extend into the root cells. Arbuscules are highly branched networks that exchange the nutrients from the soil for carbohydrates produced by the host plant during photosynthesis. AMF are also able to store lipids in vesicles, which are small, round structures within the root cells (Fig. 1b, d). AMF produce the lipids stored in vesicles from plant-derived carbon and use them for energy when the plant is not actively photosynthesizing. The host plant cannot access lipids within vesicles, so their production represents a complete transfer of carbon from plant host to fungus. Most roots do not contain all AMF structures. Even on plants colonized by AMF, not all roots show signs of colonization. On some roots, a multitude of fungal structures are evident within the roots. On others, those structures are nowhere to be found.},
doi = {10.1002/ecy.2096},
journal = {Ecology},
issn = {0012-9658},
number = 4,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

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