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Title: South Carolina Solar Development - Tracking the Effects of Act 236 (2014-2017)

Abstract

Since 2014, the installed solar capacity in South Carolina (SC) has mushroomed from 5.5 megawatts to more than 354 megawatts today. Concurrently, the number of customer-sited, load-centered solar generation was expected to grow from less than 600 statewide to as many over 10,000 today. This growth was the direct result of a landmark state policy initiative, Act 236, passed by the SC General Assembly and signed into law by the Governor in June of 2014. Local policy makers in SC were ill-equipped to handle the onslaught of solar permitting and zoning requests expected by 2021. Similarly, the state’s building inspectors, first responders, and tax assessors know little about photovoltaic (PV) technology and best practices. Finally, SC’s workforce and workforce trainers were underprepared to benefit from the tremendous opportunity created by the passage of Act 236. Each of these deficits in knowledge of and preparedness for solar PV translated into higher “soft costs” of installed solar PV in SC. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), together with almost a dozen electricity stakeholders in the Southeast, has studied the ability of Act 236 to serve as replicable model for solar PV cost reduction. In 2015, this study began with a focus onmore » the effects of Act 236 to offer a unique perspective and understanding of the actual impact of rapidly integrating solar energy into the electric grid. This study would analyze the impact of starting at a solar PV penetration of 0.1% and increasing to over 2%, while expanding access, developing regional specific training and educational materials, and developing datasets to support expanding solar markets. Through targeted tracking and analysis, the team developed a baseline of the current market, identified the major obstacles in soft cost reduction, and cooperatively developed stakeholder-centric strategies. This work has enabled us to directly track and report on the growth and effects of recently enacted solar legislation on the industry. This report marks the final in a series of reports examining the effects of Act 236 on the solar economy in SC since 2014.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1439435
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2018-00239
DOE Contract Number:  
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY

Citation Formats

Fox, E., Edwards, Thomas B., and Drory, Michael D. South Carolina Solar Development - Tracking the Effects of Act 236 (2014-2017). United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1439435.
Fox, E., Edwards, Thomas B., & Drory, Michael D. South Carolina Solar Development - Tracking the Effects of Act 236 (2014-2017). United States. doi:10.2172/1439435.
Fox, E., Edwards, Thomas B., and Drory, Michael D. Tue . "South Carolina Solar Development - Tracking the Effects of Act 236 (2014-2017)". United States. doi:10.2172/1439435. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1439435.
@article{osti_1439435,
title = {South Carolina Solar Development - Tracking the Effects of Act 236 (2014-2017)},
author = {Fox, E. and Edwards, Thomas B. and Drory, Michael D.},
abstractNote = {Since 2014, the installed solar capacity in South Carolina (SC) has mushroomed from 5.5 megawatts to more than 354 megawatts today. Concurrently, the number of customer-sited, load-centered solar generation was expected to grow from less than 600 statewide to as many over 10,000 today. This growth was the direct result of a landmark state policy initiative, Act 236, passed by the SC General Assembly and signed into law by the Governor in June of 2014. Local policy makers in SC were ill-equipped to handle the onslaught of solar permitting and zoning requests expected by 2021. Similarly, the state’s building inspectors, first responders, and tax assessors know little about photovoltaic (PV) technology and best practices. Finally, SC’s workforce and workforce trainers were underprepared to benefit from the tremendous opportunity created by the passage of Act 236. Each of these deficits in knowledge of and preparedness for solar PV translated into higher “soft costs” of installed solar PV in SC. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), together with almost a dozen electricity stakeholders in the Southeast, has studied the ability of Act 236 to serve as replicable model for solar PV cost reduction. In 2015, this study began with a focus on the effects of Act 236 to offer a unique perspective and understanding of the actual impact of rapidly integrating solar energy into the electric grid. This study would analyze the impact of starting at a solar PV penetration of 0.1% and increasing to over 2%, while expanding access, developing regional specific training and educational materials, and developing datasets to support expanding solar markets. Through targeted tracking and analysis, the team developed a baseline of the current market, identified the major obstacles in soft cost reduction, and cooperatively developed stakeholder-centric strategies. This work has enabled us to directly track and report on the growth and effects of recently enacted solar legislation on the industry. This report marks the final in a series of reports examining the effects of Act 236 on the solar economy in SC since 2014.},
doi = {10.2172/1439435},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 29 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Tue May 29 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

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