skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Investigating Sintering Mechanisms for Additive Manufacturing of Conductive Traces

Abstract

Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes enable the fabrication of miniaturized and flexible devices on complex geometries. This paper explores a hybrid additive manufacturing technology that integrates micro-extrusion and PICO-jetting methods. Conductive slurries and colloidal inks were optimized for their rheological properties to aid their precise deposition. A variety of conductive materials which include carbon, silver, nano-particle silver and nickel were deposited on both rigid (glass) and flexible (Kapton) substrates. The deposited traces were cured using two sintering mechanisms which include furnace heating and in situ laser irradiation. The effect of curing mechanism on the conductance of deposited traces was evaluated. The results indicated that traces could be cured successfully with the laser curing mechanism. Nickel and silver laser cured traces had lower resistivity than the furnace sintered traces. An increase in the laser power resulted in lower resistivity of the traces. The lowest resistivity was achieved at 40W laser power with a single laser pass. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to characterize the trace morphology and elemental compositions. Higher power laser curing resulted in better bonding of the particles. Laser cured samples had minimal oxidation to the cross-section region of the traces as compared to furnace curedmore » samples. Furthermore, this research lays the foundation for the fabrication of electronic components for a high level of freeform 3D electronics using a hybrid additive manufacturing technology.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. North Carolina A & T State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
North Carolina A & T State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Department of Energy Award: DE-NA003686 for partial support through the “Pipeline Development of Skilled Workforce through Research in Advanced Manufacturing.”; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1439168
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA000268; NA0003686
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1941-7020
Publisher:
Science Publications
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Additive Manufacturing; Electronics; Laser Curing; Multiphase Material; Sintering Mechanism

Citation Formats

McKenzie, Jasmine, and Desai, Salil. Investigating Sintering Mechanisms for Additive Manufacturing of Conductive Traces. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3844/ajeassp.2018.652.662.
McKenzie, Jasmine, & Desai, Salil. Investigating Sintering Mechanisms for Additive Manufacturing of Conductive Traces. United States. doi:10.3844/ajeassp.2018.652.662.
McKenzie, Jasmine, and Desai, Salil. Mon . "Investigating Sintering Mechanisms for Additive Manufacturing of Conductive Traces". United States. doi:10.3844/ajeassp.2018.652.662. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1439168.
@article{osti_1439168,
title = {Investigating Sintering Mechanisms for Additive Manufacturing of Conductive Traces},
author = {McKenzie, Jasmine and Desai, Salil},
abstractNote = {Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes enable the fabrication of miniaturized and flexible devices on complex geometries. This paper explores a hybrid additive manufacturing technology that integrates micro-extrusion and PICO-jetting methods. Conductive slurries and colloidal inks were optimized for their rheological properties to aid their precise deposition. A variety of conductive materials which include carbon, silver, nano-particle silver and nickel were deposited on both rigid (glass) and flexible (Kapton) substrates. The deposited traces were cured using two sintering mechanisms which include furnace heating and in situ laser irradiation. The effect of curing mechanism on the conductance of deposited traces was evaluated. The results indicated that traces could be cured successfully with the laser curing mechanism. Nickel and silver laser cured traces had lower resistivity than the furnace sintered traces. An increase in the laser power resulted in lower resistivity of the traces. The lowest resistivity was achieved at 40W laser power with a single laser pass. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to characterize the trace morphology and elemental compositions. Higher power laser curing resulted in better bonding of the particles. Laser cured samples had minimal oxidation to the cross-section region of the traces as compared to furnace cured samples. Furthermore, this research lays the foundation for the fabrication of electronic components for a high level of freeform 3D electronics using a hybrid additive manufacturing technology.},
doi = {10.3844/ajeassp.2018.652.662},
journal = {American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences},
number = 2,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: