skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession

Abstract

Past research demonstrating the importance plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem succession has focused on how plants condition soil microbial communities, impacting subsequent plant performance and successional trajectories in plant community assembly. These studies, however, largely treat microbial communities as a black box. In this study we sought to examine how emblematic shifts from early-successional Alnus sinuata (alder) to late successional Picea sitchensis (spruce) in primary succession may be reflected in specific belowground changes in bacterial community structure and nitrogen cycling related to the interaction of these two plants. We examined early successional alder-conditioned soils in a glacial forefield to delineate how alders alter the soil microbial community with increasing dominance. Further, we assessed the impact of late-successional spruce plants on these early-successional alder-conditioned microbiomes and related nitrogen cycling through a leachate addition microcosm experiment. We show how increasingly abundant alder select for particular bacterial taxa. Additionally, we found that spruce leachate drives shifts in the relative abundance of major taxa of bacteria in alder-influenced soils, including declines in those that are enriched by alder. We found these effects to be spruce-specific, beyond a general leachate effect. Our work also demonstrates a unique influence of spruce on ammonium availability. Ourmore » results show that spruce leachate addition more strongly structures bacterial communities than alders (less dispersion in bacterial community beta diversity). Such insights bolster theory relating the importance of plant-microbe interactions with late-successional plants and interspecific plant interactions more generally.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1438996
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129382
Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Frontiers in Microbiology; Journal Volume: 9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Knelman, Joseph E., Graham, Emily B., Prevéy, Janet S., Robeson, Michael S., Kelly, Patrick, Hood, Eran, and Schmidt, Steve K. Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00128.
Knelman, Joseph E., Graham, Emily B., Prevéy, Janet S., Robeson, Michael S., Kelly, Patrick, Hood, Eran, & Schmidt, Steve K. Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00128.
Knelman, Joseph E., Graham, Emily B., Prevéy, Janet S., Robeson, Michael S., Kelly, Patrick, Hood, Eran, and Schmidt, Steve K. Tue . "Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00128.
@article{osti_1438996,
title = {Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession},
author = {Knelman, Joseph E. and Graham, Emily B. and Prevéy, Janet S. and Robeson, Michael S. and Kelly, Patrick and Hood, Eran and Schmidt, Steve K.},
abstractNote = {Past research demonstrating the importance plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem succession has focused on how plants condition soil microbial communities, impacting subsequent plant performance and successional trajectories in plant community assembly. These studies, however, largely treat microbial communities as a black box. In this study we sought to examine how emblematic shifts from early-successional Alnus sinuata (alder) to late successional Picea sitchensis (spruce) in primary succession may be reflected in specific belowground changes in bacterial community structure and nitrogen cycling related to the interaction of these two plants. We examined early successional alder-conditioned soils in a glacial forefield to delineate how alders alter the soil microbial community with increasing dominance. Further, we assessed the impact of late-successional spruce plants on these early-successional alder-conditioned microbiomes and related nitrogen cycling through a leachate addition microcosm experiment. We show how increasingly abundant alder select for particular bacterial taxa. Additionally, we found that spruce leachate drives shifts in the relative abundance of major taxa of bacteria in alder-influenced soils, including declines in those that are enriched by alder. We found these effects to be spruce-specific, beyond a general leachate effect. Our work also demonstrates a unique influence of spruce on ammonium availability. Our results show that spruce leachate addition more strongly structures bacterial communities than alders (less dispersion in bacterial community beta diversity). Such insights bolster theory relating the importance of plant-microbe interactions with late-successional plants and interspecific plant interactions more generally.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2018.00128},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Tue Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}