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Title: Single-shot optical recording with sub-picosecond resolution spans record nanosecond lengths

Abstract

With the advent of electronics, oscilloscopes and photodiodes are now routinely capable of measuring events well below nanosecond resolution. However, these electronic instruments do not currently measure events below 10 ps resolution. From Walden’s observation that there is an engineering tradeoff between electronic bit depth and temporal resolution in analog-to-digital converters, this technique is projected to have extremely poor fidelity if it is extended to record single events with picosecond resolution. While this constraint may be circumvented with extensive signal averaging or other multiple measurements approaches, rare events and nonrepetitive events cannot be observed with this technique. Techniques capable of measuring information in a single shot are often required. There is a general lack of available technologies that are easily scalable to long records with sub-picosecond resolution, and are simultaneously versatile in wavelength of operation. Since it is difficult to scale electronic methods to shorter resolutions, we instead aim to scale optical methods to longer records. Demonstrated optical recording methods that have achieved 1 ps resolution and long recording lengths rely on either time scaling to slow down the temporal information or, like Wien, perform time-to-space mapping so that fast events may be captured with a conventional camera.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1438603
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-742137-
Journal ID: ISSN 1043-8092
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Laser Focus World
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 01; Journal ID: ISSN 1043-8092
Publisher:
Pennwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Muir, Ryan, and Heebner, John. Single-shot optical recording with sub-picosecond resolution spans record nanosecond lengths. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Muir, Ryan, & Heebner, John. Single-shot optical recording with sub-picosecond resolution spans record nanosecond lengths. United States.
Muir, Ryan, and Heebner, John. Thu . "Single-shot optical recording with sub-picosecond resolution spans record nanosecond lengths". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1438603,
title = {Single-shot optical recording with sub-picosecond resolution spans record nanosecond lengths},
author = {Muir, Ryan and Heebner, John},
abstractNote = {With the advent of electronics, oscilloscopes and photodiodes are now routinely capable of measuring events well below nanosecond resolution. However, these electronic instruments do not currently measure events below 10 ps resolution. From Walden’s observation that there is an engineering tradeoff between electronic bit depth and temporal resolution in analog-to-digital converters, this technique is projected to have extremely poor fidelity if it is extended to record single events with picosecond resolution. While this constraint may be circumvented with extensive signal averaging or other multiple measurements approaches, rare events and nonrepetitive events cannot be observed with this technique. Techniques capable of measuring information in a single shot are often required. There is a general lack of available technologies that are easily scalable to long records with sub-picosecond resolution, and are simultaneously versatile in wavelength of operation. Since it is difficult to scale electronic methods to shorter resolutions, we instead aim to scale optical methods to longer records. Demonstrated optical recording methods that have achieved 1 ps resolution and long recording lengths rely on either time scaling to slow down the temporal information or, like Wien, perform time-to-space mapping so that fast events may be captured with a conventional camera.},
doi = {},
journal = {Laser Focus World},
number = 01,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 18, 2019
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