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Title: Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project

Abstract

This article describes the steps taken to mitigate the impact to existing wetlands by creating new wetlands in an airport expansion project. The project addressed maintaining suitable amounts of wetlands to accommodate peak waterfowl populations, moving of high voltage power transmission towers, and maintaining agricultural and hunting interests. This project involved recreating of open water areas, marsh habitat, mud flat habitat, saline meadow habitat, maintaining two existing wetlands in the area of the new wetlands without disturbing them, and improving upland habitat surrounding the new wetlands.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sear-Brown Group, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
143838
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Public Works; Journal Volume: 125; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIRPORTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; WETLANDS; CONSTRUCTION; CLEAN AIR ACTS; FOWL; DUCKS

Citation Formats

Erickson, B.M. Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Erickson, B.M. Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project. United States.
Erickson, B.M. 1994. "Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_143838,
title = {Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project},
author = {Erickson, B.M.},
abstractNote = {This article describes the steps taken to mitigate the impact to existing wetlands by creating new wetlands in an airport expansion project. The project addressed maintaining suitable amounts of wetlands to accommodate peak waterfowl populations, moving of high voltage power transmission towers, and maintaining agricultural and hunting interests. This project involved recreating of open water areas, marsh habitat, mud flat habitat, saline meadow habitat, maintaining two existing wetlands in the area of the new wetlands without disturbing them, and improving upland habitat surrounding the new wetlands.},
doi = {},
journal = {Public Works},
number = 1,
volume = 125,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 1
}
  • This article describes the first major privatization effort to be completed at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airport owner and operator, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, decided to seek private sector involvement in a capital-intensive project to expand and upgrade the airport`s heating and air conditioning facilities and construct a new cogeneration plant. Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration (KIAC) Partners, a partnership between Gas Energy Incorporated of New York and Community Energy Alternatives of New Jersey, was selected to develop an energy center to supply electricity and hot and chilled water to meet the airport`s growingmore » energy demand. Construction of a 110 MW cogeneration plant, 7,000 tons of chilled water equipment, and 30,000 feet of hot water delivery piping started immediately. JFK Airport`s critical international position called for this substantial project to be developed almost invisibly; no interruption in heating and air conditioning service and no interference in the airport`s active operations could be tolerated. Commercial operation was achieved in February 1995.« less
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