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Title: Pollutant concentrations and emission rates from natural gas cooking burners without and with range hood exhaust in nine California homes

Abstract

Combustion pollutant concentrations were measured during the scripted operation of natural gas cooking burners in nine homes. Boiling and simmering activities were conducted on the stovetop and in the oven with and without range hood exhaust ventilation or air mixing via a forced air system. Time-resolved concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen oxides (NO x), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), particles with diameters of 6 nm or larger (PN), carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) were measured in the kitchen and bedroom area of each home. Four of the nine homes had kitchen 1 h NO 2 exceed the national ambient air quality standard (100 ppb). In all homes, the highest 1 h integrated PN exceeded 2 × 10 5 cm -3-h, and the highest 4 h PN exceeded 3 × 10 5 cm -3-hr in the kitchen. Range hood performance varied widely, but one with a large capture volume and a measured flow of 108 L/s reduced concentrations 80–95%. Increased awareness of the need to ventilate when cooking, along with building standards for minimum range hood flow rates and volume, could substantially reduce exposures to NO 2 and ultrafine particles in homes.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1437967
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Building and Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0360-1323
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Singer, Brett C., Pass, Rebecca Zarin, Delp, William W., Lorenzetti, David M., and Maddalena, Randy L. Pollutant concentrations and emission rates from natural gas cooking burners without and with range hood exhaust in nine California homes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.06.021.
Singer, Brett C., Pass, Rebecca Zarin, Delp, William W., Lorenzetti, David M., & Maddalena, Randy L. Pollutant concentrations and emission rates from natural gas cooking burners without and with range hood exhaust in nine California homes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.06.021.
Singer, Brett C., Pass, Rebecca Zarin, Delp, William W., Lorenzetti, David M., and Maddalena, Randy L. Fri . "Pollutant concentrations and emission rates from natural gas cooking burners without and with range hood exhaust in nine California homes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.06.021.
@article{osti_1437967,
title = {Pollutant concentrations and emission rates from natural gas cooking burners without and with range hood exhaust in nine California homes},
author = {Singer, Brett C. and Pass, Rebecca Zarin and Delp, William W. and Lorenzetti, David M. and Maddalena, Randy L.},
abstractNote = {Combustion pollutant concentrations were measured during the scripted operation of natural gas cooking burners in nine homes. Boiling and simmering activities were conducted on the stovetop and in the oven with and without range hood exhaust ventilation or air mixing via a forced air system. Time-resolved concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particles with diameters of 6 nm or larger (PN), carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were measured in the kitchen and bedroom area of each home. Four of the nine homes had kitchen 1 h NO2 exceed the national ambient air quality standard (100 ppb). In all homes, the highest 1 h integrated PN exceeded 2 × 105 cm-3-h, and the highest 4 h PN exceeded 3 × 105 cm-3-hr in the kitchen. Range hood performance varied widely, but one with a large capture volume and a measured flow of 108 L/s reduced concentrations 80–95%. Increased awareness of the need to ventilate when cooking, along with building standards for minimum range hood flow rates and volume, could substantially reduce exposures to NO2 and ultrafine particles in homes.},
doi = {10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.06.021},
journal = {Building and Environment},
issn = {0360-1323},
number = C,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}