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Title: Measurement of Fructose–Asparagine Concentrations in Human and Animal Foods

Abstract

The food-borne bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica, can utilize fructose-asparagine (F-Asn) as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. F-Asn is the product of an Amadori rearrangement following the non-enzymatic condensation of glucose and asparagine. Heating converts F-Asn via complex Maillard reactions to a variety of molecules which contribute to the color, taste, and aroma of heated foods. Among these is acrylamide, which is present in some foods, especially in fried potato products. The F-Asn utilization pathway in Salmonella, specifically FraB, is a potential drug target because inhibition of this enzyme would lead to intoxication of Salmonella in the presence of F-Asn. However, F-Asn would need to be packaged with the FraB inhibitor, or available in human foods. To determine if there are foods that have sufficient F-Asn, we measured F-Asn concentrations in a variety of human and animal foods. The 399 pmol/mg F-Asn found in mouse chow is sufficient to intoxicate a Salmonella fraB mutant in mouse models of salmonellosis, and several human foods were found to have this concentration or higher (fresh apricots, lettuce, asparagus, and in canned peaches). Much higher concentrations (11,000 to 35,000 pmol/mg dry weight) were found in heat-dried apricots, apples, and asparagus. This report clarifies themore » origins of F-Asn as a nutrient source for Salmonella, and identifies foods that could be used in concert with a FraB inhibitor as a therapeutic agent for Salmonella.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States
  2. Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States
  3. Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, Washington, United States
  4. Signature Sciences and Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, Washington, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1437547
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129161
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8561
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 66; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8561
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wu, Jikang, Sabag-Daigle, Anice, Metz, Thomas O., Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L., Gopalan, Venkat, Behrman, Edward J., Wysocki, Vicki H., and Ahmer, Brian M. M. Measurement of Fructose–Asparagine Concentrations in Human and Animal Foods. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04237.
Wu, Jikang, Sabag-Daigle, Anice, Metz, Thomas O., Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L., Gopalan, Venkat, Behrman, Edward J., Wysocki, Vicki H., & Ahmer, Brian M. M. Measurement of Fructose–Asparagine Concentrations in Human and Animal Foods. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04237.
Wu, Jikang, Sabag-Daigle, Anice, Metz, Thomas O., Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L., Gopalan, Venkat, Behrman, Edward J., Wysocki, Vicki H., and Ahmer, Brian M. M. Tue . "Measurement of Fructose–Asparagine Concentrations in Human and Animal Foods". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04237.
@article{osti_1437547,
title = {Measurement of Fructose–Asparagine Concentrations in Human and Animal Foods},
author = {Wu, Jikang and Sabag-Daigle, Anice and Metz, Thomas O. and Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L. and Gopalan, Venkat and Behrman, Edward J. and Wysocki, Vicki H. and Ahmer, Brian M. M.},
abstractNote = {The food-borne bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica, can utilize fructose-asparagine (F-Asn) as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. F-Asn is the product of an Amadori rearrangement following the non-enzymatic condensation of glucose and asparagine. Heating converts F-Asn via complex Maillard reactions to a variety of molecules which contribute to the color, taste, and aroma of heated foods. Among these is acrylamide, which is present in some foods, especially in fried potato products. The F-Asn utilization pathway in Salmonella, specifically FraB, is a potential drug target because inhibition of this enzyme would lead to intoxication of Salmonella in the presence of F-Asn. However, F-Asn would need to be packaged with the FraB inhibitor, or available in human foods. To determine if there are foods that have sufficient F-Asn, we measured F-Asn concentrations in a variety of human and animal foods. The 399 pmol/mg F-Asn found in mouse chow is sufficient to intoxicate a Salmonella fraB mutant in mouse models of salmonellosis, and several human foods were found to have this concentration or higher (fresh apricots, lettuce, asparagus, and in canned peaches). Much higher concentrations (11,000 to 35,000 pmol/mg dry weight) were found in heat-dried apricots, apples, and asparagus. This report clarifies the origins of F-Asn as a nutrient source for Salmonella, and identifies foods that could be used in concert with a FraB inhibitor as a therapeutic agent for Salmonella.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04237},
journal = {Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry},
issn = {0021-8561},
number = 1,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}