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Title: Leveraging microbial biosynthetic pathways for the generation of ‘drop-in’ biofuels

Abstract

Advances in retooling microorganisms have enabled bioproduction of ‘drop-in’ biofuels, fuels that are compatible with existing spark-ignition, compression-ignition, and gasturbine engines. As the majority of petroleum consumption in the United States consists of gasoline (47%), diesel fuel and heating oil (21%), and jet fuel (8%), ‘drop-in’ biofuels that replace these petrochemical sources are particularly attractive. In this review, we discuss the application of aldehyde decarbonylases to produce gasoline substitutes from fatty acid products, a recently crystallized reductase that could hydrogenate jet fuel precursors from terpene synthases, and the exquisite control of polyketide synthases to produce biofuels with desired physical properties (e.g., lower freezing points). With our increased understanding of biosynthetic logic of metabolic pathways, we discuss the unique advantages of fatty acid, terpene, and polyketide synthases for the production of bio-based gasoline, diesel and jet fuel.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Horsholm (Denmark)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1436998
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1398632
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Current Opinion in Biotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0958-1669
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Zargar, Amin, Bailey, Constance B., Haushalter, Robert W., Eiben, Christopher B., Katz, Leonard, and Keasling, Jay D.. Leveraging microbial biosynthetic pathways for the generation of ‘drop-in’ biofuels. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.03.004.
Zargar, Amin, Bailey, Constance B., Haushalter, Robert W., Eiben, Christopher B., Katz, Leonard, & Keasling, Jay D.. Leveraging microbial biosynthetic pathways for the generation of ‘drop-in’ biofuels. United States. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.03.004.
Zargar, Amin, Bailey, Constance B., Haushalter, Robert W., Eiben, Christopher B., Katz, Leonard, and Keasling, Jay D.. Mon . "Leveraging microbial biosynthetic pathways for the generation of ‘drop-in’ biofuels". United States. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.03.004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1436998.
@article{osti_1436998,
title = {Leveraging microbial biosynthetic pathways for the generation of ‘drop-in’ biofuels},
author = {Zargar, Amin and Bailey, Constance B. and Haushalter, Robert W. and Eiben, Christopher B. and Katz, Leonard and Keasling, Jay D.},
abstractNote = {Advances in retooling microorganisms have enabled bioproduction of ‘drop-in’ biofuels, fuels that are compatible with existing spark-ignition, compression-ignition, and gasturbine engines. As the majority of petroleum consumption in the United States consists of gasoline (47%), diesel fuel and heating oil (21%), and jet fuel (8%), ‘drop-in’ biofuels that replace these petrochemical sources are particularly attractive. In this review, we discuss the application of aldehyde decarbonylases to produce gasoline substitutes from fatty acid products, a recently crystallized reductase that could hydrogenate jet fuel precursors from terpene synthases, and the exquisite control of polyketide synthases to produce biofuels with desired physical properties (e.g., lower freezing points). With our increased understanding of biosynthetic logic of metabolic pathways, we discuss the unique advantages of fatty acid, terpene, and polyketide synthases for the production of bio-based gasoline, diesel and jet fuel.},
doi = {10.1016/j.copbio.2017.03.004},
journal = {Current Opinion in Biotechnology},
number = C,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 2 works
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