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Title: Ten questions concerning occupant behavior in buildings: The big picture

Abstract

Occupant behavior has significant impacts on building energy performance and occupant comfort. However, occupant behavior is not well understood and is often oversimplified in the building life cycle, due to its stochastic, diverse, complex, and interdisciplinary nature. The use of simplified methods or tools to quantify the impacts of occupant behavior in building performance simulations significantly contributes to performance gaps between simulated models and actual building energy consumption. Therefore, it is crucial to understand occupant behavior in a comprehensive way, integrating qualitative approaches and data- and model-driven quantitative approaches, and employing appropriate tools to guide the design and operation of low-energy residential and commercial buildings that integrate technological and human dimensions. This paper presents ten questions, highlighting some of the most important issues regarding concepts, applications, and methodologies in occupant behavior research. The proposed questions and answers aim to provide insights into occupant behavior for current and future researchers, designers, and policy makers, and most importantly, to inspire innovative research and applications to increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use in buildings.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)
  3. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1436621
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1412553
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Building and Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0360-1323
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Occupant Behavior; behavior modeling; building performance; building simulation; energy use; interdisciplinary

Citation Formats

Hong, Tianzhen, Yan, Da, D'Oca, Simona, and Chen, Chien-fei. Ten questions concerning occupant behavior in buildings: The big picture. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2016.12.006.
Hong, Tianzhen, Yan, Da, D'Oca, Simona, & Chen, Chien-fei. Ten questions concerning occupant behavior in buildings: The big picture. United States. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2016.12.006.
Hong, Tianzhen, Yan, Da, D'Oca, Simona, and Chen, Chien-fei. Tue . "Ten questions concerning occupant behavior in buildings: The big picture". United States. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2016.12.006. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1436621.
@article{osti_1436621,
title = {Ten questions concerning occupant behavior in buildings: The big picture},
author = {Hong, Tianzhen and Yan, Da and D'Oca, Simona and Chen, Chien-fei},
abstractNote = {Occupant behavior has significant impacts on building energy performance and occupant comfort. However, occupant behavior is not well understood and is often oversimplified in the building life cycle, due to its stochastic, diverse, complex, and interdisciplinary nature. The use of simplified methods or tools to quantify the impacts of occupant behavior in building performance simulations significantly contributes to performance gaps between simulated models and actual building energy consumption. Therefore, it is crucial to understand occupant behavior in a comprehensive way, integrating qualitative approaches and data- and model-driven quantitative approaches, and employing appropriate tools to guide the design and operation of low-energy residential and commercial buildings that integrate technological and human dimensions. This paper presents ten questions, highlighting some of the most important issues regarding concepts, applications, and methodologies in occupant behavior research. The proposed questions and answers aim to provide insights into occupant behavior for current and future researchers, designers, and policy makers, and most importantly, to inspire innovative research and applications to increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use in buildings.},
doi = {10.1016/j.buildenv.2016.12.006},
journal = {Building and Environment},
number = C,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Tue Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 20works
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