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Title: Phase I Final Report: Plasma-Assisted Low-Temperature Combustion and Ignition

Abstract

This Phase I program addresses new opportunities to improve the performance of ozone production, which is inherently an inefficient process. In fact, roughly 90% of the electrical energy used to produce ozone is converted to waste heat that needs to be removed, else the ozone gas temperature increases causing it to dissociate back to molecular oxygen. In effect, the heat produced in the production of ozone can also be responsible for destroying the very ozone produced. At ACT, Inc., we developed, fabricated and tested a lab-scale, flat plate ozone generator and experimentally demonstrated the advantage of cooling both the ground and the high voltage electrodes. Cooling both electrodes resulted in the lowest gas temperatures and highest ozone yield and highest ozone production efficiency. Cooling only the high voltage electrode showed the next best performance followed by cooling the ground electrode only, which showed the lowest performance. In addition, the use of dielectric beads in a low-temperature plasma-based ozone generator was evaluated showing up to 2.6 times higher ozone yield for the same electrical power compared to the base case without beads. As such, the use of a dielectric packed bed ozone generator offers a new, potentially transformational approach to substantiallymore » improve ozone yield and ozone production efficiency beyond that achieved using traditional plasma-based ozone generators. Also, computational models were developed at ACT and in collaboration with researchers at Princeton University. The models quantitatively compute the ozone concentration as a function of the reduced electric field, electron number density, gas temperature, and inlet concentration(s). Moreover, these models provide a better understanding of the chemistry involved in ozone production and will be extended to guide our experimental program in Phase II. Regarding commercialization, relations were also developed with both small and large companies involved in ozone generation across a broad range of scales for different applications. They have expressed interest and will partner with us in Phase II.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Contributing Org.:
Princeton University, NJ (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1436088
Report Number(s):
DOE-ACT-18128
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0018128
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; Low-temperature plasma; ozone generation; non-thermal plasma

Citation Formats

Pearlman, Howard. Phase I Final Report: Plasma-Assisted Low-Temperature Combustion and Ignition. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Pearlman, Howard. Phase I Final Report: Plasma-Assisted Low-Temperature Combustion and Ignition. United States.
Pearlman, Howard. Mon . "Phase I Final Report: Plasma-Assisted Low-Temperature Combustion and Ignition". United States.
@article{osti_1436088,
title = {Phase I Final Report: Plasma-Assisted Low-Temperature Combustion and Ignition},
author = {Pearlman, Howard},
abstractNote = {This Phase I program addresses new opportunities to improve the performance of ozone production, which is inherently an inefficient process. In fact, roughly 90% of the electrical energy used to produce ozone is converted to waste heat that needs to be removed, else the ozone gas temperature increases causing it to dissociate back to molecular oxygen. In effect, the heat produced in the production of ozone can also be responsible for destroying the very ozone produced. At ACT, Inc., we developed, fabricated and tested a lab-scale, flat plate ozone generator and experimentally demonstrated the advantage of cooling both the ground and the high voltage electrodes. Cooling both electrodes resulted in the lowest gas temperatures and highest ozone yield and highest ozone production efficiency. Cooling only the high voltage electrode showed the next best performance followed by cooling the ground electrode only, which showed the lowest performance. In addition, the use of dielectric beads in a low-temperature plasma-based ozone generator was evaluated showing up to 2.6 times higher ozone yield for the same electrical power compared to the base case without beads. As such, the use of a dielectric packed bed ozone generator offers a new, potentially transformational approach to substantially improve ozone yield and ozone production efficiency beyond that achieved using traditional plasma-based ozone generators. Also, computational models were developed at ACT and in collaboration with researchers at Princeton University. The models quantitatively compute the ozone concentration as a function of the reduced electric field, electron number density, gas temperature, and inlet concentration(s). Moreover, these models provide a better understanding of the chemistry involved in ozone production and will be extended to guide our experimental program in Phase II. Regarding commercialization, relations were also developed with both small and large companies involved in ozone generation across a broad range of scales for different applications. They have expressed interest and will partner with us in Phase II.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as May 7, 2022
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

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