skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Fabrication of Extreme Environment Materials for Large Parts Using Additive Manufacturing Methods

Abstract

Development of extreme environment materials (EEM) and related advanced manufacturing processes for system components that are able to withstand the typically harsh environments while also achieving sought-after performance is critical. Additive manufacturing (AM) is of great interest for the production of fossil energy-based system components due to its ability to allow flexibility of design, production of complex parts, and lower cost due to reduced materials requirement, decreased lead times, etc. However, the EEM materials explored by AM process is limited and the ability of AM to produce dimensionally large parts from EEM is lacking and more R&D is needed to realize the full potential of AM as a viable alternative to traditional manufacturing processes. In this Phase I project, HiFunda/UConn developed selective laser melting (SLM) process parameters for IN939, a higher temperature superalloy, using a commercial system. Microstructure and hardness of AM IN939 samples were characterized and are comparable to reported properties of IN718. A gas turbine component, generic nozzle guide vane ring with internal cooling, was also demonstrated using the commercial system and the parameters developed. In phase I, a demonstration device for Large Area Selective Laser Melting (LASLM) is developed. In view of challenges of cost-effective Large Areamore » Selective Laser Melting, a hybrid design that utilizes dual stage scanning is proposed and designed for Phase II. Also in phase I, we explored Selective Area Forging (SAF) on AM IN939 samples, in an attempt to introduce in-situ microstructure and mechanical property enhancement in AM process. We proved that plastic deformation and hardness increase occurred in the SAF areas. The costeffective design of large area selective laser melting and in-situ microstructure and property control can help to realize the full potential of AM for extreme environment materials in fossil energy power production.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. HiFunda LLC
  2. Uiniversity of Connecticut
  3. University of Connecticut
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
HiFunda LLC, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1435934
Report Number(s):
DOE-HiFunda-SC0017759
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0017759
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Additive Manufacturing, Gas Turbine, Selective Laser Melting (SLM), Nickel-Based Superalloys, IN939

Citation Formats

Wang, Jiwen, Chen, Xu, and Hebert, Rainer. Fabrication of Extreme Environment Materials for Large Parts Using Additive Manufacturing Methods. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Wang, Jiwen, Chen, Xu, & Hebert, Rainer. Fabrication of Extreme Environment Materials for Large Parts Using Additive Manufacturing Methods. United States.
Wang, Jiwen, Chen, Xu, and Hebert, Rainer. Fri . "Fabrication of Extreme Environment Materials for Large Parts Using Additive Manufacturing Methods". United States.
@article{osti_1435934,
title = {Fabrication of Extreme Environment Materials for Large Parts Using Additive Manufacturing Methods},
author = {Wang, Jiwen and Chen, Xu and Hebert, Rainer},
abstractNote = {Development of extreme environment materials (EEM) and related advanced manufacturing processes for system components that are able to withstand the typically harsh environments while also achieving sought-after performance is critical. Additive manufacturing (AM) is of great interest for the production of fossil energy-based system components due to its ability to allow flexibility of design, production of complex parts, and lower cost due to reduced materials requirement, decreased lead times, etc. However, the EEM materials explored by AM process is limited and the ability of AM to produce dimensionally large parts from EEM is lacking and more R&D is needed to realize the full potential of AM as a viable alternative to traditional manufacturing processes. In this Phase I project, HiFunda/UConn developed selective laser melting (SLM) process parameters for IN939, a higher temperature superalloy, using a commercial system. Microstructure and hardness of AM IN939 samples were characterized and are comparable to reported properties of IN718. A gas turbine component, generic nozzle guide vane ring with internal cooling, was also demonstrated using the commercial system and the parameters developed. In phase I, a demonstration device for Large Area Selective Laser Melting (LASLM) is developed. In view of challenges of cost-effective Large Area Selective Laser Melting, a hybrid design that utilizes dual stage scanning is proposed and designed for Phase II. Also in phase I, we explored Selective Area Forging (SAF) on AM IN939 samples, in an attempt to introduce in-situ microstructure and mechanical property enhancement in AM process. We proved that plastic deformation and hardness increase occurred in the SAF areas. The costeffective design of large area selective laser melting and in-situ microstructure and property control can help to realize the full potential of AM for extreme environment materials in fossil energy power production.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as May 4, 2022
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share: