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Title: INL-EXT--18-50231-Rev000

Abstract

There is an urgency to advancing wastewater technologies due to aging water infrastructure and emerging regulations. A crosscutting working group proposes a conceptual design for a test bed network to understand and evaluate wastewater technologies to drive acceptance and deployment of new technologies to enhance performance. The working group includes contributors from the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. National Science Foundation, and the Water Research Foundation (formerly known as the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation). In “The Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities” (June 2014), the U.S. Department of Energy identified key issues with water-energy interdependencies and identified water resource recovery (broadly referred to as “wastewater management” or “sewage treatment”) as a locus of opportunities to improve energy and water security. Traditional sewage treatment uses more than 30 billion kWh per year, almost one percent of our electricity supply (EPRI 2013), and energy use grew 74 percent from 1996 to 2011 (Tarallo 2014). Wastewater is a potential alternative source to address water scarcity. In addition, wastewater contains valuable energy, nutrient, and mineral resources. Traditional sewage treatment does not recover water or other resources. With improved technology and design, reclaimed wastewater could supplement existing water suppliesmore » and mitigate water stress. The energy (biogas and heat), nutrients (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus), and minerals in wastewater could displace fossil sources, reduce America’s dependence on imported energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. If fully implemented, resource recovery would reduce discharges to the environment and provide ecosystem services. The primary role of both public and private wastewater facilities is to reduce risk to human health and the environment. The institutional driver is to meet regulatory requirements. Capital budgets and revenue from taxes and services are limited at wastewater utilities, reducing the ability to invest in innovation. Therefore, utilities are very risk averse and slow to adopt new technologies that go beyond their traditional historical mandate.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Idaho National Laboratory
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Energy Policy and Systems Analysis
OSTI Identifier:
1435801
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 - ENGINEERING; Wastewater; Resource Recovery; Technology Test Bed

Citation Formats

Snyder, Seth W, and Simon, A.J. INL-EXT--18-50231-Rev000. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1435801.
Snyder, Seth W, & Simon, A.J. INL-EXT--18-50231-Rev000. United States. doi:10.2172/1435801.
Snyder, Seth W, and Simon, A.J. Tue . "INL-EXT--18-50231-Rev000". United States. doi:10.2172/1435801. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1435801.
@article{osti_1435801,
title = {INL-EXT--18-50231-Rev000},
author = {Snyder, Seth W and Simon, A.J.},
abstractNote = {There is an urgency to advancing wastewater technologies due to aging water infrastructure and emerging regulations. A crosscutting working group proposes a conceptual design for a test bed network to understand and evaluate wastewater technologies to drive acceptance and deployment of new technologies to enhance performance. The working group includes contributors from the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. National Science Foundation, and the Water Research Foundation (formerly known as the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation). In “The Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities” (June 2014), the U.S. Department of Energy identified key issues with water-energy interdependencies and identified water resource recovery (broadly referred to as “wastewater management” or “sewage treatment”) as a locus of opportunities to improve energy and water security. Traditional sewage treatment uses more than 30 billion kWh per year, almost one percent of our electricity supply (EPRI 2013), and energy use grew 74 percent from 1996 to 2011 (Tarallo 2014). Wastewater is a potential alternative source to address water scarcity. In addition, wastewater contains valuable energy, nutrient, and mineral resources. Traditional sewage treatment does not recover water or other resources. With improved technology and design, reclaimed wastewater could supplement existing water supplies and mitigate water stress. The energy (biogas and heat), nutrients (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus), and minerals in wastewater could displace fossil sources, reduce America’s dependence on imported energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. If fully implemented, resource recovery would reduce discharges to the environment and provide ecosystem services. The primary role of both public and private wastewater facilities is to reduce risk to human health and the environment. The institutional driver is to meet regulatory requirements. Capital budgets and revenue from taxes and services are limited at wastewater utilities, reducing the ability to invest in innovation. Therefore, utilities are very risk averse and slow to adopt new technologies that go beyond their traditional historical mandate.},
doi = {10.2172/1435801},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Technical Report:

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