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Title: Fast multipole method using Cartesian tensor in beam dynamic simulation

Abstract

Here, the fast multipole method (FMM) using traceless totally symmetric Cartesian tensor to calculate the Coulomb interaction between charged particles will be presented. The Cartesian tensor-based FMM can be generalized to treat other non-oscillating interactions with the help of the differential algebra or the truncated power series algebra. Issues on implementation of the FMM in beam dynamic simulations are also discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
  2. Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1435590
Report Number(s):
JLAB-ACP-16-2366; DOE/OR/23177-3970
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1812; Conference: Advanced Accelerator Concepts, National Harbor, MD (United States), 31 Jul - 5 Aug 2016; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Zhang, He, Huang, He, Li, Rui, Chen, Jie, and Luo, Li -Shi. Fast multipole method using Cartesian tensor in beam dynamic simulation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4975862.
Zhang, He, Huang, He, Li, Rui, Chen, Jie, & Luo, Li -Shi. Fast multipole method using Cartesian tensor in beam dynamic simulation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975862.
Zhang, He, Huang, He, Li, Rui, Chen, Jie, and Luo, Li -Shi. Mon . "Fast multipole method using Cartesian tensor in beam dynamic simulation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975862. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1435590.
@article{osti_1435590,
title = {Fast multipole method using Cartesian tensor in beam dynamic simulation},
author = {Zhang, He and Huang, He and Li, Rui and Chen, Jie and Luo, Li -Shi},
abstractNote = {Here, the fast multipole method (FMM) using traceless totally symmetric Cartesian tensor to calculate the Coulomb interaction between charged particles will be presented. The Cartesian tensor-based FMM can be generalized to treat other non-oscillating interactions with the help of the differential algebra or the truncated power series algebra. Issues on implementation of the FMM in beam dynamic simulations are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4975862},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = ,
volume = 1812,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 06 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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