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Title: Multiple LHCII antennae can transfer energy efficiently to a single Photosystem I

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1435466
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-98ER20310
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1858; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-04-30 21:44:54; Journal ID: ISSN 0005-2728
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bos, Inge, Bland, Kaitlyn M., Tian, Lijin, Croce, Roberta, Frankel, Laurie K., van Amerongen, Herbert, Bricker, Terry M., and Wientjes, Emilie. Multiple LHCII antennae can transfer energy efficiently to a single Photosystem I. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2017.02.012.
Bos, Inge, Bland, Kaitlyn M., Tian, Lijin, Croce, Roberta, Frankel, Laurie K., van Amerongen, Herbert, Bricker, Terry M., & Wientjes, Emilie. Multiple LHCII antennae can transfer energy efficiently to a single Photosystem I. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2017.02.012.
Bos, Inge, Bland, Kaitlyn M., Tian, Lijin, Croce, Roberta, Frankel, Laurie K., van Amerongen, Herbert, Bricker, Terry M., and Wientjes, Emilie. Mon . "Multiple LHCII antennae can transfer energy efficiently to a single Photosystem I". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2017.02.012.
@article{osti_1435466,
title = {Multiple LHCII antennae can transfer energy efficiently to a single Photosystem I},
author = {Bos, Inge and Bland, Kaitlyn M. and Tian, Lijin and Croce, Roberta and Frankel, Laurie K. and van Amerongen, Herbert and Bricker, Terry M. and Wientjes, Emilie},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbabio.2017.02.012},
journal = {Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics},
number = 5,
volume = 1858,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.bbabio.2017.02.012

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 5works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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