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Title: Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization

Abstract

Amorphous and nanograined (NG) steels are two categories of strong steels. However, over the past decade, their application has been hindered by their limited plasticity, the addition of expensive alloying elements, and processing challenges associated with producing bulk materials. Here in this work, we report that the surface of a carburized Fe-Mn-Si martensitic steel with extremely low elemental alloying additions can be economically fabricated into an amorphous-nanocrystalline hybrid structure. Atom probe tomography and nanobeam diffraction of a hard turned steel surface together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the original cementite surface structure experiences a size-dependent amorphization and phase transformation during heavy plastic deformation. MD simulations further show that the martensite-cementite interface serves as a nucleation site for cementite amorphization, and that cementite can become disordered if further strained when the cementite particles are relatively small. These graded structures exhibit a surface hardness of ~16.2 GPa, which exceeds the value of ~8.8 GPa for the original nanocrystalline martensitic steel and most nanocrystalline steels reported before. Finally, this practical and cost-efficient approach for producing a hard surface with retained bulk ductility and toughness can provide expanded opportunities for producing an amorphous-crystalline hybrid structure in steels and other alloy systems.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [4];  [6]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [7];  [2]; ORCiD logo [8]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Timken World Headquarters, North Canton, OH (United States). Material Science Research and Development
  2. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States). Department of Material Science and Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory
  3. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Department
  4. Timken World Headquarters, North Canton, OH (United States). Material Science Research and Development
  5. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  6. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
  7. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Integrated Systems Engineering
  8. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1435196
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 152; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Amorphous-crystalline hybrid structure; Atom probe tomography; Molecular dynamics simulation; Cementite decomposition; Hard turning

Citation Formats

Guo, Wei, Meng, Yifei, Zhang, Xie, Bedekar, Vikram, Bei, Hongbin, Hyde, Scott, Guo, Qianying, Thompson, Gregory B., Shivpuri, Rajiv, Zuo, Jian-min, and Poplawsky, Jonathan D. Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2018.04.013.
Guo, Wei, Meng, Yifei, Zhang, Xie, Bedekar, Vikram, Bei, Hongbin, Hyde, Scott, Guo, Qianying, Thompson, Gregory B., Shivpuri, Rajiv, Zuo, Jian-min, & Poplawsky, Jonathan D. Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization. United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2018.04.013.
Guo, Wei, Meng, Yifei, Zhang, Xie, Bedekar, Vikram, Bei, Hongbin, Hyde, Scott, Guo, Qianying, Thompson, Gregory B., Shivpuri, Rajiv, Zuo, Jian-min, and Poplawsky, Jonathan D. Wed . "Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization". United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2018.04.013.
@article{osti_1435196,
title = {Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization},
author = {Guo, Wei and Meng, Yifei and Zhang, Xie and Bedekar, Vikram and Bei, Hongbin and Hyde, Scott and Guo, Qianying and Thompson, Gregory B. and Shivpuri, Rajiv and Zuo, Jian-min and Poplawsky, Jonathan D.},
abstractNote = {Amorphous and nanograined (NG) steels are two categories of strong steels. However, over the past decade, their application has been hindered by their limited plasticity, the addition of expensive alloying elements, and processing challenges associated with producing bulk materials. Here in this work, we report that the surface of a carburized Fe-Mn-Si martensitic steel with extremely low elemental alloying additions can be economically fabricated into an amorphous-nanocrystalline hybrid structure. Atom probe tomography and nanobeam diffraction of a hard turned steel surface together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the original cementite surface structure experiences a size-dependent amorphization and phase transformation during heavy plastic deformation. MD simulations further show that the martensite-cementite interface serves as a nucleation site for cementite amorphization, and that cementite can become disordered if further strained when the cementite particles are relatively small. These graded structures exhibit a surface hardness of ~16.2 GPa, which exceeds the value of ~8.8 GPa for the original nanocrystalline martensitic steel and most nanocrystalline steels reported before. Finally, this practical and cost-efficient approach for producing a hard surface with retained bulk ductility and toughness can provide expanded opportunities for producing an amorphous-crystalline hybrid structure in steels and other alloy systems.},
doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2018.04.013},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
number = C,
volume = 152,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Wed Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

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