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Title: Cost comparison of printed circuit heat exchanger to low cost periodic flow regenerator for use as recuperator in a s-CO 2 Brayton cycle

Abstract

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO 2) power cycles have the potential to deliver high efficiency at low cost. However, in order for an sCO 2 cycle to reach high efficiency, highly effective recuperators are needed. These recuperative heat exchangers must transfer heat at a rate that is substantially larger than the heat transfer to the cycle itself and can therefore represent a significant portion of the power block costs. Regenerators are proposed as a cost saving alternative to high cost printed circuit recuperators for this application. A regenerator is an indirect heat exchanger which periodically stores and releases heat to the working fluid. The simple design of a regenerator can be made more inexpensively compared to current options. The objective of this paper is a detailed evaluation of regenerators as a competing technology for recuperators within an sCO 2 Brayton cycle. The level of the analysis presented here is sufficient to identify issues with the regenerator system in order to direct future work and also to clarify the potential advantage of pursuing this technology. A reduced order model of a regenerator is implemented into a cycle model of an sCO 2 Brayton cycle. An economic analysis investigates the cost savings thatmore » is possible by switching from recuperative heat exchangers to switched-bed regenerators. The cost of the regenerators was estimated using the amount of material required if the pressure vessel is sized using ASME Boiler Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) requirements. The cost of the associated valves is found to be substantial for the regenerator system and is estimated in collaboration with an industrial valve supplier. The result of this analysis suggests that a 21.2% reduction in the contribution to the Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCoE) from the power block can be realized by switching to a regenerator-based system.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1434935
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0007120
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 208; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Supercritical CO2; Brayton; Regenerator; Recuperator

Citation Formats

Hinze, Jacob F., Nellis, Gregory F., and Anderson, Mark H. Cost comparison of printed circuit heat exchanger to low cost periodic flow regenerator for use as recuperator in a s-CO2 Brayton cycle. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.09.037.
Hinze, Jacob F., Nellis, Gregory F., & Anderson, Mark H. Cost comparison of printed circuit heat exchanger to low cost periodic flow regenerator for use as recuperator in a s-CO2 Brayton cycle. United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.09.037.
Hinze, Jacob F., Nellis, Gregory F., and Anderson, Mark H. Thu . "Cost comparison of printed circuit heat exchanger to low cost periodic flow regenerator for use as recuperator in a s-CO2 Brayton cycle". United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.09.037.
@article{osti_1434935,
title = {Cost comparison of printed circuit heat exchanger to low cost periodic flow regenerator for use as recuperator in a s-CO2 Brayton cycle},
author = {Hinze, Jacob F. and Nellis, Gregory F. and Anderson, Mark H.},
abstractNote = {Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) power cycles have the potential to deliver high efficiency at low cost. However, in order for an sCO2 cycle to reach high efficiency, highly effective recuperators are needed. These recuperative heat exchangers must transfer heat at a rate that is substantially larger than the heat transfer to the cycle itself and can therefore represent a significant portion of the power block costs. Regenerators are proposed as a cost saving alternative to high cost printed circuit recuperators for this application. A regenerator is an indirect heat exchanger which periodically stores and releases heat to the working fluid. The simple design of a regenerator can be made more inexpensively compared to current options. The objective of this paper is a detailed evaluation of regenerators as a competing technology for recuperators within an sCO2 Brayton cycle. The level of the analysis presented here is sufficient to identify issues with the regenerator system in order to direct future work and also to clarify the potential advantage of pursuing this technology. A reduced order model of a regenerator is implemented into a cycle model of an sCO2 Brayton cycle. An economic analysis investigates the cost savings that is possible by switching from recuperative heat exchangers to switched-bed regenerators. The cost of the regenerators was estimated using the amount of material required if the pressure vessel is sized using ASME Boiler Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) requirements. The cost of the associated valves is found to be substantial for the regenerator system and is estimated in collaboration with an industrial valve supplier. The result of this analysis suggests that a 21.2% reduction in the contribution to the Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCoE) from the power block can be realized by switching to a regenerator-based system.},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.09.037},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = C,
volume = 208,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Sep 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 21, 2018
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Cited by: 2 works
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